Security, Civil Liberties, and Unions

By Harry Fleischman; Joyce Lewis Kornbluh et al. | Go to book overview

Who Is A Risk?

"For as long as the U.S. leads the forces of freedom in the world's great ideological struggle, our institutions will remain under a global spotlight, and what we do will speak much louder than what we say. If our actions continuously testify to our belief in justice, other free nations will be fortified in their pursuit of the same ideal.

"Since the instinct of justice is universal every citizen . . . can serve justice by living more consciously in its spirit and by keeping his own vigilant watch on the rights he shares with his fellow citizen. . . .

"The moral is that if each minority, each professional group and each citizen would imagine himself in the other's shoes, everybody's rights would have firmer supports."

-- Earl Warren, Chief Justice, U. S. Supreme Court

ARE you a security risk?

If you're an active union member, the decision of some security officers might well be, Yes. Take James Schuetz' story as he told it to the Senate Subcommittee on Constitutional Rights in November 1955.

Jim had worked at Bell Aircraft in Niagara Falls, New York, since 1940. He was a union steward, chairman of the steward's council and chairman of his local union's education committee. Since the company was working on defense contracts, Jim's job required a Government security clearance, which he had held since 1946.

In 1949, Local 501 of the United Automobile Workers went on strike for almost five months. Jim was one of the strike leaders. A year and a half later, he was called into the Army Air Force office at Bell Aircraft. An Air Force major handed him a letter stating that his security clearance had been withdrawn. Jim returned to his department, where a company representative was waiting to tell him that as a "security risk" he could no longer be employed at Bell.

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Security, Civil Liberties, and Unions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Table of Contents 3
  • Foreword - By William F. Schnitzler Secretary-Treasurer 5
  • Who is a Risk? 9
  • How the Industrial Security Program Works 16
  • Other Programs Affecting Union Members 22
  • Union Criticisms 26
  • The Fifth Amendment 39
  • The Butler Bill 43
  • A Union Program 45
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