The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3

By John Lothrop Motley | Go to book overview

The walls were again hung with the magnificent tapestry of Gideon, while the knights of the Fleece, with all the other grandees of the land, were assembled to grace the spectacle.1 The King was represented by his envoy in England, Don Guzman De Silva, who came to Brussels for the occasion, and who had been selected for this duty because, according to Armenteros, "he was endowed, beside his prudence, with so much witty gracefulness with ladies in matters of pastime and entertainment."2 Early in the month of December, a famous tournament was held in the great market-place of Brussels, the Duke of Parma, the Duke of Aerschot, and Count Egmont being judges of the jousts. Count Mansfeld was the challenger, assisted by his son Charles, celebrated among the gentry of the land for his dexterity in such sports. To Count Charles was awarded upon this occasion the silver cup from the lady of the lists. Count Bossu received the prize for breaking best his lances; the Seigneur de Beauvoir for the most splendid entrance; Count Louis, of Nassau, for having borne himself most gallantly in the mêlée. On the same evening the nobles, together with the bridal pair, were entertained at a splendid supper given by the city of Brussels in the magnificent Hôtel de Ville. On this occasion the prizes gained at the tournament were distributed, amid the applause and hilarity of all the revellers.3

Thus, with banquet, tourney, and merry marriage bells, with gaiety gilding the surface of society, while a deadly hatred to the Inquisition was eating into the heart of the nation, and while the fires of civil war were already kindling, of which no living man was destined to witness the extinction, ended the year 1565.


CHAPTER VI.

Francis Junius -- His sermon at Culemburg House -- The Compromise -- Portraits of Sainte Aldegonde, of Louis Nassau, of "Toison d'Or," of Charles Mansfeld -- Sketch of the Compromise -- Attitude of Orange -- His letter to the Duchess -- Signers of the Compromise -- Indiscretion of the Confederates -- Espionage over Philip by Orange -- Dissatisfaction of the seigniors -- Conduct of Egmont -- Despair of the people -- Emigration to England -- Its effects -- The Request -- Meeting at Breda and Hoogstraaten -- Exaggerated statements concerning the Request in the state-council -- Hesitation of the Duchess -- Assembly of notables -- Debate concerning the Request and the Inquisition -- Character of Brederode -- Arrival of the petitioners in Brussels -- Presentation of the Request -- Emotion of Margaret -- Speech of Brederode -- Sketch of the Request -- Memorable sarcasm of Berlaymont -- Deliberation in the state-council -- Apostille to the Request -- Answer to the Apostille -- Reply of the Duchess -- Speech of D'Esquerdes -- Response of Margaret -- Memorable banquet at Culemburg House -- Name of "the beggars" adopted -- Orange, Egmont, and Horn break up the riotous meeting -- Costume of "the beggars" -- Brederode at Antwerp -- Horrible execution at Oudenarde -- Similar cruelties throughout the provinces -- Project of "Moderation" -- Religious views of Orange -- His resignation of all his offices not; accepted -- The "Moderation" characterised -- Egmont at Arras -- Debate on the "Moderation" -- Vacillation of Egmont -- Mission of Montigny and Berghen to Spain -- Instructions to the envoys -- Secret correspondence of Philip with the Pope concerning the Netherland Inquisition and the edicts -- Field-preaching in the provinces -- Modet at Ghent -- Other preachers characterised -- Excitement at Tournay -- Peter Gabriel at Harlem -- Field-preaching near Antwerp -- Embarrassment of the Regent -- Excitement at Antwerp -- Pensionary Wesenbeck sent to Brussels -- Orange at Antwerp -- His patriotic course -- Misrepresentation of the Duchess -- Intemperate zeal of Dr Rythovius -- Meeting at St Trond -- Conference at Duffel -- Louis Nassau deputed to the Regent -- Unsatisfactory negotiations.

THE most remarkable occurence in the earlier part of the year 1566 was the famous Compromise. This document, by which the signers pledged themselves to oppose the Inquisition, and to defend each other against all consequences of such a resistance, was probably the work of Philip de Mar

____________________
1
De la Barre MS., 57.
2
"Tiene tambien gracia y donaire con las damas en las cosas de passatiempo y entretenimiento." -- Correspondance de Philippe II., i. 365, 366.
3
De la Barre MS.

-242-

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The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • The Rise of the Dutch Republic 1
  • Part I - Philip the Second in the Netherlands 50
  • Chapter I 50
  • Chapter II 70
  • Chapter III 104
  • Part II - Administration of the Duchess Margaret. 1559-1567 116
  • Chapter I 116
  • Chapter II 137
  • Chapter III 164
  • Chapter IV 191
  • Chapter V 215
  • Chapter VI 242
  • Chapter VII 273
  • Chapter VIII 286
  • Chapter IX 300
  • Chapter X 322
  • Part III - Alva. 1567-1573 335
  • Chapter I 335
  • Chapter II 361
  • Chapter III 393
  • Chapter IV 406
  • Chapter V 424
  • Chapter VI 447
  • Chapter VII 470
  • Chapter VIII 494
  • Chapter IX 518
  • Note 543
  • Part IV - Administration of the Grand Commander 545
  • Chapter I 545
  • Chapter II 566
  • Chapter III 582
  • Chapter IV 608
  • Chapter V 623
  • Part V - Don John of Austria 648
  • Chapter I 648
  • Chapter II 675
  • Chapter III 696
  • Chapter IV 717
  • Chapter V 746
  • Part VI - Alexander of Parma 769
  • Chapter I 769
  • Chapter II 795
  • Chapter III 813
  • Chapter IV 827
  • Chapter V 848
  • Chapter VI 866
  • Chapter VII 887
  • Index 905
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