The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3

By John Lothrop Motley | Go to book overview

THE .
RISE OF THE DUTCH REPUBLIC

CHAPTER VI.

O ange and Count Louis in France -- Peace with the Huguenots -- Coligny's memoir, pre-
sented by request to Charles IX., on the subject of invading the Netherlands -- Secret
correspondence of Orange organised by Paul Buys -- Privateering commissions issued by
the Prince -- Regulations prescribed by him for the fleets thus created -- Impoverished
condition of the Prince -- His fortitude -- His personal sacrifices and privations -- His
generosity -- Renewed contest between the Duke and the Estates on the subject of the
Alva tenth and twentieth pence -- Violent disputes in the council -- Firm opposition of Viglius
-- Edict commanding the immediate collection of the tax -- Popular tumults -- Viglius
denounced by Alva -- The Duke's fierce complaints to the King -- Secret schemes of Philip
against Queen Elizabeth of England -- The Ridolfi plot to murder Elizabeth counte-
nanced by Philip and Pius V. -- The King's orders to Alva to further the plan -- The
Duke's remonstrances -- Explosion of the plot -- Obstinacy of Philip -- Renewed com-
plaints of Alva as to the imprudent service required of him -- Other attempts of Philip to
murder Elizabeth -- Don John of Austria in the Levant -- Battle of Lepanto -- Slothfulness
of Selim -- Appointment of Medina Coelgli -- Incessant wrangling in Brussels upon the tax --
Persevering efforts of Orange -- Contempt of Alva for the Prince -- Proposed sentence of
ignominy against his name -- Sonoy's mission to Germany -- Remarkable papers issued by
the Prince -- The "harangue" -- Intense hatred for Alva entertained by the highest as
well as lower orders -- Visit of Francis de Alava to Brussels -- His unfavourable report to
the King -- Querulous language of the Duke -- Deputation to Spain -- Universal revolt
against the tax -- Ferocity of Alva -- Execution of eighteen tradesmen secretly ordered --
Interrupted by the capture of Brill -- Beggars of the sea -- The younger Wild Boar of
Ardennes -- Reconciliation between the English government and that of Alva -- The
Netherland privateersmen ordered out of English ports -- De la Marck's fleet before Brill
-- The town summoned to surrender -- Commissioners sent out to the fleet -- Flight of the
magistrates and townspeople -- Capture of the place -- Indignation of Alva -- Popular ex-
ultation in Brussels -- Puns and caricatures -- Bossu ordered to recover the town of Brill
-- His defeat -- His perfidious entrance into Rotterdam -- Massacre in that city -- Flushing
revolutionised -- Unsuccessful attempt of Governor de Bourgogne to recall the citizens to
their obedience -- Expedition under Treslong from Brill to assist the town of Flushing --
Murder of Pacheco by the Patriots -- 't Zeraerts appointed Governor of Walcheren by
Orange.

WHILE such had been the domestic events of the Netherlands during the years 1569 and 1570, the Prince of Orange, although again a wanderer, had never allowed himself to despair. During this whole period, the darkest hour for himself and for his country, he was ever watchful. After disbanding his troops at Strasburg, and after making the best arrangements possible under the circumstances for the eventual payment of their wages, he had joined the army which the Duke of Deux Ponts had been raising in Germany to assist the cause of the Huguenots in France.1 The Prince having been forced to acknowledge that, for the moment, all open efforts in the Netherlands were likely to be fruitless, instinctively turned his eyes towards the more favourable aspect of the Reformation in France. It was inevitable that, while he was thus thrown for the time out of his legitimate employment, he should be led to the battles of freedom in a neighbour-

____________________
1
Bor, v.269. Archives et Correspondance, iii.316.

-447-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • The Rise of the Dutch Republic 1
  • Part I - Philip the Second in the Netherlands 50
  • Chapter I 50
  • Chapter II 70
  • Chapter III 104
  • Part II - Administration of the Duchess Margaret. 1559-1567 116
  • Chapter I 116
  • Chapter II 137
  • Chapter III 164
  • Chapter IV 191
  • Chapter V 215
  • Chapter VI 242
  • Chapter VII 273
  • Chapter VIII 286
  • Chapter IX 300
  • Chapter X 322
  • Part III - Alva. 1567-1573 335
  • Chapter I 335
  • Chapter II 361
  • Chapter III 393
  • Chapter IV 406
  • Chapter V 424
  • Chapter VI 447
  • Chapter VII 470
  • Chapter VIII 494
  • Chapter IX 518
  • Note 543
  • Part IV - Administration of the Grand Commander 545
  • Chapter I 545
  • Chapter II 566
  • Chapter III 582
  • Chapter IV 608
  • Chapter V 623
  • Part V - Don John of Austria 648
  • Chapter I 648
  • Chapter II 675
  • Chapter III 696
  • Chapter IV 717
  • Chapter V 746
  • Part VI - Alexander of Parma 769
  • Chapter I 769
  • Chapter II 795
  • Chapter III 813
  • Chapter IV 827
  • Chapter V 848
  • Chapter VI 866
  • Chapter VII 887
  • Index 905
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 930

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.