The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3

By John Lothrop Motley | Go to book overview

Nine Muses, all in classical costume; at the helm stood Neptune with his trident. The Muses executed some beautiful concerted pieces; Apollo twanged his lute. Having reached the landing-place, this deputation from Parnassus stepped on shore, and stood awaiting the arrival of the procession. Each professor, as he advanced, was gravely embraced and kissed by Apollo and all the Nine Muses in turn, who greeted their arrival besides with the recitation of an elegant Latin poem. This classical ceremony terminated, the whole procession marched together to the cloister of Saint Barbara, the place prepared for the new university, where they listened to an eloquent oration by the Rev. Caspar Kolhas, after which they partook of a magnifcent banquet. With this memorable feast, in the place where famine had so lately reigned, the ceremonies were concluded.1


CHAPTER III.

Latter days of the Blood Council -- Informal and insincere negotiations for peace -- Characteristics of the negotiators and of their diplomatic correspondence -- Dr Junius -- Secret conferences between Dr Leoninus and Orange -- Steadfastness of the Prince -- Changes in the internal government of the northern provinces -- Generosity and increasing power of the municipalities -- Incipient jealousy in regard to Orange rebuked -- His offer of resignation refused by the Estates -- His elevation to almost unlimited power -- Renewed mediation of Maximilian -- Views and positions of the parties -- Advice of Orange -- Opening of negotiations at Breda -- Propositions and counter-propositions -- Adroitness of the plenipotentiaries on both sides -- Insincere diplomacy and unsatisfactory results -- Union of Holland and Zealand under the Prince of Orange -- Act defining his powers -- Charlotte de Bourbon -- Character, fortunes, and fate of Anna of Saxony -- Marriage of Orange with Mademoiselle de Bourbon -- Indignation thereby excited -- Horrible tortures inflicted upon Rapists by Sonoy in North Holland -- Oudewater and Schoonoven taken by Hierges -- The Isles of Zealand -- A Submarine expedition projected -- Details of the adventure -- Its entire success -- Death of Chiappin Vitelli -- Deliberations in Holland and Zealand concerning the renunciation of Philip's authority -- Declaration at Delft -- Doubts as to which of the Great Powers the sovereignty should be offered -- Secret international relations -- Mission to England -- Unsatisfactory negotiations with Elizabeth -- Position of the Grand Commander -- Siege of Zierickzee -- Generosity of Count John -- Desperate project of the Prince -- Death and character of Requesens.

THE Council of Troubles, or, as it will be for ever denominated in history, the Council of Blood, still existed, although the Grand Commander, upon his arrival in the Netherlands, had advised his sovereign to consent to the immediate abolition of so odious an institution.2 Philip, accepting the advice of his governor and his cabinet, had accordingly authorised him, by a letter of the 10th of March 1574, to take that step if he continued to believe it advisable.3

Requesens had made use of this permission to extort money from the obedient portion of the provinces. An assembly of deputies was held at Brussels on the 7th of June, 1574, and there was a tedious interchange of protocols, reports, and remonstrances.4 The estates, not satisfied with the extinction of a tribunal which had at last worn itself out by its own violence, and had become inactive through lack of victims, insisted on greater concessions. They demanded the departure of the Spanish troops, the establishment of a council of Netherlanders in Spain for Netherland affairs, the restoration to offices, in the provinces, of natives and natives only;4 for these drawers of documents thought it possible, at that epoch, to recover by pedantry what their brethern of Holland and Zealand were maintaining with the sword. It was not the moment for historical disquisition, citations from Solomon, nor chopping of logic; yet

____________________
1
Bor, viii. 594, 595.
2
Lettre de Pequesens à Philippe II., Dec. 30, 1673, apud Gachard, Notice, etc., 24
3
Gachard, Notice, etc., 24, 26.
4
Bor, viii. 517-523, seq.

-582-

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The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • The Rise of the Dutch Republic 1
  • Part I - Philip the Second in the Netherlands 50
  • Chapter I 50
  • Chapter II 70
  • Chapter III 104
  • Part II - Administration of the Duchess Margaret. 1559-1567 116
  • Chapter I 116
  • Chapter II 137
  • Chapter III 164
  • Chapter IV 191
  • Chapter V 215
  • Chapter VI 242
  • Chapter VII 273
  • Chapter VIII 286
  • Chapter IX 300
  • Chapter X 322
  • Part III - Alva. 1567-1573 335
  • Chapter I 335
  • Chapter II 361
  • Chapter III 393
  • Chapter IV 406
  • Chapter V 424
  • Chapter VI 447
  • Chapter VII 470
  • Chapter VIII 494
  • Chapter IX 518
  • Note 543
  • Part IV - Administration of the Grand Commander 545
  • Chapter I 545
  • Chapter II 566
  • Chapter III 582
  • Chapter IV 608
  • Chapter V 623
  • Part V - Don John of Austria 648
  • Chapter I 648
  • Chapter II 675
  • Chapter III 696
  • Chapter IV 717
  • Chapter V 746
  • Part VI - Alexander of Parma 769
  • Chapter I 769
  • Chapter II 795
  • Chapter III 813
  • Chapter IV 827
  • Chapter V 848
  • Chapter VI 866
  • Chapter VII 887
  • Index 905
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