The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3

By John Lothrop Motley | Go to book overview

been loyal, and had earned many laurels against the rebels, while Champagny was still devoutly a Papist, and wavered painfully between his hatred to heresy and to Spain. Egmont and De Héze were raw, unpractised lads, in whom genius did not come to supply the place of experience. The Commander, De Goignies, was a veteran, but a veteran who had never gained much glory, and the chiefs of the cavalry, infantry, and artillery, were absent at the Brussels wedding. The news of this additional massacre inflicted upon a nation, for which Berghen and Montigny had laid down their lives, was the nuptial benediction for Berghen's heiress; for it was to the chief wedding guests upon that occasion that the disaster was justly attributed. The rank and file of the states' army were mainly mercenaries, with whom the hope of plunder was the prevailing motive; the chief commanders were absent; while those officers who were with the troops were neither heartily friendly to their own flag, nor sufficiently experienced to make it respected.


CHAPTER V.

Towns taken by Don John -- Wrath excited against the aristocratic party by the recent defeat -- Attempts upon Amsterdam -- "Satisfaction" of Amsterdam and its effects -- De Selles sent with royal letters from Spain -- Terms offered by Philip -- Proclamation of Don John -- Correspondence between De Selles and the States-General -- Between the King and the Governor-General -- New forces raised by the States -- St Aldegonde at the Diet- Municipal Revolution in Amsterdam -- The Prince's letter on the subject of the Anabaptists of Middelburg -- The two armies inactive -- De la Noue -- Action at Rijnemants- John Casimir -- Perverse politics of Queen Elizabeth -- Alencon in the Netherlands -- Portrait of the Duke -- Orange's position in regard to him -- Avowed and supposed policy of the French court -- Anger of Elizabeth -- Terms arranged between Alencon and the Estates -- Renewed negotiations with Don John -- Severe terms offered him -- Interview of the English envoys with the Governor -- Despondency of Don John -- Orange's attempts to enforce a religious peace -- His isolation in sentiment -- The malcontent party -- Count John Governor of Gelderland -- Proposed form of religious peace -- Proclamation to that effect by Orange, in Antwerp -- A petition in favour of the Roman Church presented by Champagny and other Catholic nobles to the States-General -- Consequent commotion in Brussels -- Champagny and others imprisoned -- Indolence and poverty of the two armies -- Illness and melancholy of Don John -- His letters to Doria, to Mendoza, and to the King -- Death of Don John -- Suspicions of poison -- Pompous burial -- Removal of his body to Spain -- Concluding remarks upon his character.

Don John having thus vindicated his own military fame and the amazing superiority of the Spanish arms, followed up his victory by the rapid reduction of many towns of second-rate importance. Louvain, Judoigne, Tirlemont, Aerschot, Bouvignes, Sichem, Nivelle, Roeux, Soignies, Binch, Beaumont, Walcourt, Maubeuge, and Chimay, either submitted to their conqueror, or were taken after short sieges. The usual atrocities were inflicted upon the unfortunate inhabitants of towns where resistance was attempted. The commandant of Sichem was hanged out of his own window, along with several chief burghers and officers, while the garrison was put to the sword, and the bodies cast into the Demer. The only crime committed by these unfortunates was to have ventured a blow or two in behalf of the firesides which they were employed to protect.1

In Brussels, on the other hand, there was less consternation excited by these events than boundless rage against the aristocratic party; for the defeat of Gemblours was attributed, with justice, to the intrigues and the incapacity of the Catholic magnates. It was with difficulty that Orange,

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1
Bor, xii. 934, sqq. Hoofd, xiii. 551. Meteren, viii. 133. Strada, ix. 473. -- "Alexander omissa intempestira benignitate," says the professed panegyrist of the Farnese family -- "ex ipsa arce decem palam suspendi, reliquos (centum circiter ac septuaginta) noctu jugulatos in subjectum amnem projici jubet."

-746-

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The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • The Rise of the Dutch Republic 1
  • Part I - Philip the Second in the Netherlands 50
  • Chapter I 50
  • Chapter II 70
  • Chapter III 104
  • Part II - Administration of the Duchess Margaret. 1559-1567 116
  • Chapter I 116
  • Chapter II 137
  • Chapter III 164
  • Chapter IV 191
  • Chapter V 215
  • Chapter VI 242
  • Chapter VII 273
  • Chapter VIII 286
  • Chapter IX 300
  • Chapter X 322
  • Part III - Alva. 1567-1573 335
  • Chapter I 335
  • Chapter II 361
  • Chapter III 393
  • Chapter IV 406
  • Chapter V 424
  • Chapter VI 447
  • Chapter VII 470
  • Chapter VIII 494
  • Chapter IX 518
  • Note 543
  • Part IV - Administration of the Grand Commander 545
  • Chapter I 545
  • Chapter II 566
  • Chapter III 582
  • Chapter IV 608
  • Chapter V 623
  • Part V - Don John of Austria 648
  • Chapter I 648
  • Chapter II 675
  • Chapter III 696
  • Chapter IV 717
  • Chapter V 746
  • Part VI - Alexander of Parma 769
  • Chapter I 769
  • Chapter II 795
  • Chapter III 813
  • Chapter IV 827
  • Chapter V 848
  • Chapter VI 866
  • Chapter VII 887
  • Index 905
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