The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3

By John Lothrop Motley | Go to book overview

INDEX.
ACCORD, signed between Margaret of Parma and confederated Netherland nobles, 1566, 286; of 29th of October, 1576, between Sancho d'Avila and Count Oberstein, 632.
Address, royal, issued by Alva after the fall of Harlem, 519.
Adrian VI., Pope, denounces the crimes of the Church, 41.
Aerschot, Duke of, his birth and character, 53; quarrels with Egmont, and refuses to join league against Granvelle, 192; appointed Governor of the citadel of Antwerp, after its evacuation by Spanish troops, 674; selfishness of his character and motives, ib.; is distrusted by all parties, ib.; oath of allegiance administered to him by Escovedo, ib.; his falseness, both to Don John and Prince of Orange, 694; informs Don John that Prince of Orange is meditating a forcible seizure of his person, ib.; gives Orange private information concerning the government, and sends him intercepted letters from his enemies, 695; deserts Don John, and makes up to Orange again, after failure of the former's plan against Antwerp citadel, 713; head of the cabal to bring Archduke of Austria to Netherlands, 727; discontent of people with his appointment as Governor of Flanders, ib.; his entry into Ghent as Governor of Flanders, ib.; suspicions entertained of him by Reformed party there, ib.; capitulates to insurgents of Ghent, 731; is taken prisoner by them, ib.
Alava, Don Francis de, forged letter from, to Margaret of Parma, 301; report to Philip on state of Netherlands and conduct of Alva, 461.
Aldegonde, St Philip de Marnix, lord of, said to be the author of the compromise, 242; his character and attainments, 244; address to congress of Dort, in behalf of Prince of Orange, 478; despatched to Harlem by Prince of Orange, to make a thorough change in body of magistracy, 503; his life saved by capture of Spanish Admiral Bossu, 536; is released from prison, and despatched on secret mission to Orange and the estates, 583; report of estates in answer to his propositions, 584; is sent as chief of a mission to Queen Elizabeth of England, to offer to her the sovereignty of Holland and Zealand, 604; leaves England without having effected his purpose, 605; lays before estates meagre result of his mission, 606; his despair at religious tolerance of Prince of Orange, 687.
Alençon, Duke of, and Anjou, intrigues of Catholic Netherland nobles with, 754; his character and career, 755; relations with Prince of Orange, 756; despatches envoys to states-general of Netherlands and to Orange, to offer assistance after battle of Gemblours, 757; engagements entered into between him and statesgeneral of Netherlands, 758; departure from Netherlands, 780; exchange of courtesy with estates, 781; policy of electing him for sovereign of Netherlands, 848; limitations to be put to his power, 850; arrives in Netherlands in 1581, at the head of five thousand troops, 850; departs for England, ib.; special mission from estates proceeds to England to make arrangements for his formal installation as sovereign of Netherlands, 852; returns to Netherlands, accompanied by a number of English gentlemen, 853; is received at Flushing by Orange and deputation from states-general, ib.; his personal appearance, ib.; his character and capacities, ib.; ceremony of his inauguration, 854; procession escorting him to Antwerp, ib.; festive reception within the city, 855; prohibitions against Catholic worship raised, 856; constitution signed by him at Bordeaux, 857; is suspected of complicity in attempted assassination of Orange, 858; is formally accepted as Duke of Gueldres and Lord of Friesland, 863; scheme to poison him and Orange, ib.; ceremonies of his reception at Ghent interrupted by an attack on his troops by Parma, 869; first whisperings of treason against Orange and against the states, ib.; plot for seizing the most important cities by surprise, and making himself absolute master, ib.; failure of the plot at Bruges, 870; mendacious asseverations used to allay suspicions of his plot against Antwerp, 871; attempt upon the city, ib.; total failure, 873; indignation of French noblemen in his suite at his treachery, 874; causes of his defeat at Antwerp, ib.; effrontery evinced in subsequent communications with Orange and with magistracy of Antwerp, 875; declares attempt upon Antwerp to have been quite unexpected by him, 877; efforts at reconciliation, ib.; intrigues with agents of Parma, 879; provisional accord signed between him and provinces, 26th and 28th March, 882; leaves Netherlands never to return, ib.; enters into renewed negotiations with states-general, 887; is taken ill and dies, ib.

-905-

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The Rise of the Dutch Republic: A History - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • The Rise of the Dutch Republic 1
  • Part I - Philip the Second in the Netherlands 50
  • Chapter I 50
  • Chapter II 70
  • Chapter III 104
  • Part II - Administration of the Duchess Margaret. 1559-1567 116
  • Chapter I 116
  • Chapter II 137
  • Chapter III 164
  • Chapter IV 191
  • Chapter V 215
  • Chapter VI 242
  • Chapter VII 273
  • Chapter VIII 286
  • Chapter IX 300
  • Chapter X 322
  • Part III - Alva. 1567-1573 335
  • Chapter I 335
  • Chapter II 361
  • Chapter III 393
  • Chapter IV 406
  • Chapter V 424
  • Chapter VI 447
  • Chapter VII 470
  • Chapter VIII 494
  • Chapter IX 518
  • Note 543
  • Part IV - Administration of the Grand Commander 545
  • Chapter I 545
  • Chapter II 566
  • Chapter III 582
  • Chapter IV 608
  • Chapter V 623
  • Part V - Don John of Austria 648
  • Chapter I 648
  • Chapter II 675
  • Chapter III 696
  • Chapter IV 717
  • Chapter V 746
  • Part VI - Alexander of Parma 769
  • Chapter I 769
  • Chapter II 795
  • Chapter III 813
  • Chapter IV 827
  • Chapter V 848
  • Chapter VI 866
  • Chapter VII 887
  • Index 905
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