Racism: A Short History

By George M. Fredrickson | Go to book overview

INDEX
Adam and Eve story (Genesis), 52, 66
Adas, Michael, 61, 108
affirmative action decision (U.S.), 143
Afghanistan Taliban government, 149
African Americans: affirmative action and, 143; associated with Southern defeat, 106; “aversive racism” triggered against, 10; Benedict on equality of, 166; comparison of German Jews and, 82–85, 86–89, 93–94; competition between immigrants and, 86–87; Curse of Ham associated with, 29, 43–45, 51–52, 80, 176n.55; discrimination justified by “dysfunctional” subculture of, 142; emancipation of, 81–84; fear of sexual pollution or violation by, 119–121; French discussions on ugliness of, 68; Great Migration to urban North by, 115; intermarriage ban lifted and, 131; Jim Crow laws and, 83, 101, 102, 109, 110–111, 129, 130, 167; legacy of slavery and perception of, 94–95; postWorld War II racial reform and, 129– 132, 137–138; racial Darwinism and, 85–86; racialism on, 160–161; racism ideology of inferiority of, 79–81; rac ist reprisal response to equality of, 93; romantic racialism beliefs about, 154; slavery of, 80–81; voting rights protection given to, 130; World War II impact on racial reform and, 129–130. See also American white supremacy
African National Congress, 137
African slavery: Curse of Ham myth justification for, 29, 43–45, 51–52, 80, 176n.55; democratic revolution chalglenging, 64–66; lasting legacy of, 94– 95; New World forced labor vs., 38– 40; New World legal/religious status criteria for, 54–55; origins of race as sociation with, 29–30; precolonial, 30; religious justification of, 38–39; skin pigmentation as justifying, 39. See also slavery
Afrikaner nationalism, 3–4
An American Dilemma (Myrdal), 129, 167
American Indians: assimilationism and, 73; assimiliation practiced by tribes of, 155; bifurcated wild man/noble savage images of, 36; “black legend”

-193-

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