Earl Grey and the Australian Colonies, 1846-1857: A Study of Self-Government and Self-Interest

By John M. Ward | Go to book overview

XII
THE PROPOSALS OF THE FEDERALISTS

LORD JOHN RUSSELL'S declaration that, the British Government would not legislate for the federation of the Australian colonies until they themselves had requested it, changed the whole outlook for federation in Australia. Up to 1855 it had always seemed possible that the colonies would be federated, not by their own choice, but by some stroke of impesrial policy. Grey originally had not contemplated a federal compact. His intention in 1847 had been to establish a federal union by an act of the imperial parliament. The idea of giving the colonies power to federate themselves when they chose to do so was no part of the original plan. When the Privy Council Committee adopted it, Grey still tried to fix by legislation the terms and conditions on which federation might take place. After the withdrawal of the federal clauses from the Australian Colonies Bill in 1850, he appears to have been convinced that no legislation to federate the colonies ought to be passed until they had requested it. Perhaps because the colonial constitutions' were not yet settled, his decision not to impose federation appears to have been ignored in Australia. FitzRoy, to whom it was communicated, does not seem to have drawn any special notice to it. So far as the colonists were concerned, it still seemed possible that a federal union might be established by act of parliament, without any significant participation on their part.

The constitutional committees of New South Wales and Victoria1 thought some form of federal union might be set up by parliament at the same time as the new constitutions were enacted. Although the colonies had been allowed to draft their constitutions, the committees did not suggest that representatives from the colonies should meet to draw up a scheme of federal union. That task was left to the British Government. The committees recognized implicitly that federation might be more welcome to some colonies than to others, but they did not believe that a federal union had to be based upon any act of will on the part of all the colonies that were to be its members.

After 1855 the essential conditions of federalism in Australia

____________________
1
See ch. xi.

-347-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Earl Grey and the Australian Colonies, 1846-1857: A Study of Self-Government and Self-Interest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • I - The Story in Brief 1
  • II - A Man of Faith 18
  • III - The Grain and the Chaff 45
  • IV - The Golden Despatch 84
  • V - The Report in Statutory Dress 107
  • VI - Apathy in Australia 121
  • VII - Setback in Parliament 162
  • VIII - The 'Anti-Felon Confederation' 196
  • IX - A Noble Amateur: Governor-General Fitzroy 227
  • X - Governor-General Denison: 'A Man of More Purpose' 283
  • XI - Constitution-Making in the Colonies 319
  • XII - The Proposals of the Federalists 347
  • XIII - The Murray River Trade 393
  • XIV - The Failure of the Federalists 427
  • Bibliography 471
  • Index 491
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 496

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.