The Economics of Consumption

By Charles S. Wyand | Go to book overview

for most people. With the existing centralized control of income distribution, with the fairly definite limits now set on the average income, and in consideration of the tenor of current economic trends, all consumers and most producers would find that they could satisfy more of their wants if they partially shifted their economic efforts from production to the more effective use of their existing wealth and income.


Summary

Although all persons in the population consume and most produce, a distinction between producers and consumers is justifiable because the present means of distributing income within the United States establishes fairly definite limits to the possibilities of expanding purchasing power through productive effort. Of the five definitions reviewed in an attempt to define the consumer type, all proved unsatisfactory for the purposes of economics. The consumer was finally redefined as any person whose produc- tivity as measured by his current income is less than current ex- penditures for the satisfaction of his personal wants. In terms of this definition it was discovered that about three-fifths of the population of the United States are consumers who would, if wise, concentrate their economic activity upon their consuming function. Moreover, a considerable number of the producer group would find their own economic welfare best fostered by making a more equitable distribution of their efforts between the acquisition and the effective use of wealth. Since a consumer type exists and since this type has a predominant economic interest in the problems of consumption, it now remains for us to analyze those factors which result in maximum efficiency in the use of existing resources.

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Economics of Consumption
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 568

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.