America Builds: The Record of PWA

By Public Works Administration | Go to book overview

Chapter III Mandate of Congress

IT IS no simple task to build 34,500 public works across 3 million square miles of America, to provide millions of man- hours of work in private industry in depression times. The building up of the greatest construction agency of modern times is a story of pioneering noteworthy in itself. It is the story of transforming a 6,000-word law of Congress into an organization that has affected 130 million Americans in their daily lives.

Tried and tested by 6 years of service, the PWA organization is made up of a group of seasoned technical experts plus a force of stenographers and clerks at work in every section of the country and in the Islands and Territories.

-33-

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America Builds: The Record of PWA
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Prefatory Note ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Section One ix
  • Chapter I - Theory and Facts 1
  • Chapter II - Men and Materials 17
  • Chapter III - Mandate of Congress 33
  • Chapter IV - Legal Framework 49
  • Chapter V - Loans and Bonds 61
  • Chapter VI - Engineering Blueprints 73
  • Chapter VII - Honest Dollars 83
  • Section Two 93
  • Chapter VIII - Chapter VIII the Federal Programs 95
  • Chapter IX - Electric Power 115
  • Chapter X - For Better Education 127
  • Chapter XI - AIDS to Health 141
  • Chapter XII - Sewage and Stream Pollution 155
  • Chapter XIII - Water is Life 169
  • Chapter XIV - Land Sea and Air 181
  • Chapter XV - For Government Business 195
  • Chapter XVI - Public Housing 207
  • Chapter XVII - Summary 219
  • Chapter XVIII - Case Histories 225
  • Appendix 263
  • Index 293
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