Handbook of Federal World War Agencies and Their Records, 1917-1921

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WORLD WAR AGENCIES AND THEIR RECORDS

A

ABRASIVES SECTION, ELECTRODES AND , Chemicals Division, War Industries Board. -- See ELECTRODES AND ABRASIVES SECTION.

ABSORBENT TESTING SECTION , Gas-Mask Research Division, War Gas Investigations, Mines Bureau, Interior Department. -- See GAS-MASK RESEARCH DIVISION.

ACCIDENT PREVENTION SECTION , Fire and Accident Prevention Branch, Operations Control Division, Storage Service, Purchase and Storage Service, Purchase, Storage, and Traffic Division, General Staff, War Department. -- See FIRE AND ACCIDENT PREVENTION BRANCH.

ACCIDENTS DUE TO EXPLOSIVES SECTION, INVESTIGATION OF , Mining Division, Mines Bureau, Interior Departnent. -- See MINING DIVISION.

ACCOUNTING COMMITTEE , Public Service and Accounting Division, Railroad Administration. -- Created on April 2, 1918. Took over functions formerly handled by the Military Transportation Accounting Committee of the Railroads' War Board. Abolished February 1, 1919. Functions: To advise the Director of the Division on railroad accounting procedures. During the period of Government operation of the railroads, many changes in accounting methods were made in the interests of uniformity and efficiency. Records: Whereabouts unknown.

ACCOUNTING DIVISION , Depot Department, General Engineer Depot, Office of the Chief of Engineers, War Department. -- In existence by June 21, 1918. Operated through five Sections, as follows: Initial Overseas Issues, Automatic Overseas Issues, United States Issues, Property Returns and Records, and Reports of Receipts and Shipments. In accordance with Supply Circular No. 99, Purchase, Storage, and Traffic Division, of October 22, 1918, its functions were transferred to the Machinery and Engineering Materials Division, Office of the Director of Purchase. Functions: To maintain records of stock on hand at all depots, to correlate all requisitions for stock, to correlate priorities of requisitions, and to transmit the final tabulations of demands to the appropriate depots. Records: Probably with those of the Office of the Chief of Engineers in NA.

ACCOUNTING DIVISION , Railroad Administration. -- First existed as a part of the Public Service and Accounting Division; created as a separate Division on Febuary 1, 1919. Its functions were transferred to the Comptroller's Office on January 7, 1920. Functions: To handle accounts of the central administration of the railroads and the combined accounts of all railroads under Federal control, and to prescribe railroad accounting practices. Records: 1918-20 (a small quantity, combined with those of the Comptroller's Office, 1918-36, total 103 feet) in NA. Include records relating to accounting operations and administrative matters and some correspondence with railroads relating to claims. The bulk of the records was authorized for destruction on March 30, 1934.

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Handbook of Federal World War Agencies and Their Records, 1917-1921
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • List of Compilers iv
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • General Bibliography xi
  • World War Agencies and Their Records 1
  • Appendix 635
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