Mambo Montage: The Latinization of New York

By Agustín Laó-Montes; Arlene Dávila | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
Deceptive Solidity
Public Signs, Civic Inclusion, and
Language Rights in New York City
(and Beyond)
Vilma Santiago-Irizarry

Some years ago, when I was teaching courses on Latino identity and culture at the City University of New York's John Jay College of Criminal Justice, my Latino students would argue that the course material I was assigning was too dark. 1 Drawing upon my training in anthropological modes of cultural critique as well as my own knowledge and experiences in and of the United States, I wanted my students to challenge essentializing definitions of cultural identity as well as received historical accounts that reduce the complex processes shaping ethnoracial histories in the United States to dominant narratives of eventual assimilation, incorporation, and success derived from typified (and somewhat dubious) “white ethnic” experiences (di Leonardo 1998; Urciuoli 1996).

This, I believe, is crucial in these times when dominant neoconservative discourses capitalize upon widely held beliefs that inequality and exclusion in the United States have been vanquished through institutional, legal, and sociocultural advancement. In these discourses, current advocacy is often represented as the product of self-interested ethnic political activism. 2 Contemporary demands for equality, entitlement, and inclusion are deemed unnecessary, even spurious. 3 Yet, even admitting to some degree of change, the multiple Latino histories in the United States are still embedded in a sociocultural context permeated by inequality of conditions. Latinos are also affected by monocultural and monoglottic 4 ideologies and practices that prevail in spite of current mainstream claims to multiculturalism and plurality (Darder and Torres 1998). The trend for acknowledging the Latino

-473-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mambo Montage: The Latinization of New York
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 493

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.