To Serve God and Mammon: Church-State Relations in American Politics

By Ted G. Jelen | Go to book overview

Glossary

Accommodationism A narrow interpretation of the Establishment Clause in which government is forbidden only to provide assistance to particular churches. Accommodationists believe that neutral government support for religion in general is permissible.

American Center for Law and Justice A conservative religious group, founded by the Rev. Marion "Pat" Robertson, that seeks to protect religious liberty. The ACLJ represents Christians who believe they have been the victims of discrimination.

American Civil Liberties Union A long-standing interest group in American politics that exists to protect the constitutional rights of American citizens. The ACLU is unpopular among members of the Christian Right.

American exceptionalism A belief that the United States is a unique nation and thus is not directly comparable with other nations.

Americans United for the Separation of Church and State (AUSCS) An interest group founded by television producer Norman Lear, which opposes any form of governmental support for religion.

Amicus curiae Literally, "friend of the court"; an advisory brief submitted to a court by a person or organization not named as a party in the case or controversy being considered by the court.

Bread for the World An ecumenical religious organization dedicated to fighting world hunger.

Burger Court The United States Supreme Court during the period in which Warren Burger was chief justice (1969-1986). The Burger Court was generally expected to reverse some of the tendencies of the Warren Court, and move the Court in a more conservative direction. However, in the area of church-state relations, the Burger Court is best known for its ruling in Lemon v. Kurtzman, which is generally considered a strongly separationist interpretation of the Establishment Clause.

Catholic Alliance An organization founded in 1995, which was intended to attract Catholic support for the Christian Right.

Christian Coalition An interest group founded by the Rev. Marion "Pat" Robertson, which seeks a more assertive role for religion in American public life.

Christian preferentialism The combination of an accommodationist reading of the Establishment Clause with a communalist reading of the Free Exercise Clause. Communalists believe that nondiscriminatory government assistance to religious bodies is permissible, and that government may generally regulate unorthodox or unpopular religious practices.

Civil religion The veneration of symbols and artifacts of the American political system or political culture (e.g., the flag and the Constitution).

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
To Serve God and Mammon: Church-State Relations in American Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - The Religion Clauses *
  • 2 - The Uses of History *
  • 3 - Debating the Public Role of Religion *
  • 4 - From Christian America to Free Exercise *
  • 5 - The Future of the Church-State Debate *
  • Appendix Selected Supreme Court Decisions *
  • Glossary *
  • References *
  • Index 151
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 155

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.