The Right Brain and the Unconscious: Discovering the Stranger Within

By R. Joseph | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

When I was a young child, I was very fortunate in that my grandmother, Mrs. Regina Becker, would read to me stories from the books of Moses and Job—and try to explain to me the unfathomable and unknown face of God. I cannot say if my grandmother's reading sparked in me an interest in biblical archaeology, philosophy, psychology, evolution, and ancient history, in particular that of ancient Egypt, but these subjects appealed to me greatly, and I increasingly spent a good part of my childhood, teenage, and adult years thinking and reading about these and related topics. It wasn't clear to me at first, but I was trying to solve a puzzle. However, it wasn't the mind of God I was attempting to discern, but our own unconscious origins. Nevertheless, although I studied Freud, Jung, Nietzsche, Sartre, mythology, ancient history, anthropology, and so on, the puzzle remained exactly that, a puzzle with many missing pieces. Fortunately, after beginning college, I met a brilliant graduate student, David Duvall, who awakened in me a new interest, the brain. I realized then that, if I could learn to understand how the brain worked, I might be able to discover the missing pieces of the enigma that had intrigued me for so many years.

Over the course of the last two decades, I pursued that goal and have had the opportunity to conduct a number of research and behav

-v-

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