The Whistleblowers: Exposing Corruption in Government and Industry

By Myron Peretz Glazer; Penina Migdal Glazer | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
The Fight Goes On

WHEN SID RHODES, a key participant in exposing patient deaths at the County Mental Health facility in San Diego (see pages 188-97), left CMH in 1986, he quickly secured a new position as a social worker in a private mental-health organization, where he works today. Although he has much to be proud of for his crucial role in providing the momentum for a pioneering California law that makes it a criminal offense to retaliate against whistleblowers, he and his companion, Terri Richardson, now express deep dissatisfaction with their ordeal. Rhodes had a heart attack that he believes was caused by the stress of his experience at CMH; and during the height of the struggle, he and Richardson felt so threatened that they kept a gun in the house. Terri told us she had suffered from feeling emotionally isolated and abandoned when Sid became obsessed with the events at CMH. In speaking to us, they alluded half jokingly to John Wayne's characterization of the heroic sheriff in True Grit. Unlike the movie character, however, Sid and Terri did not ride off into the sunset at the conclusion of their adventure. And now that it is all over, they wonder what that experience really meant. Was the struggle worth it? 1

It is a legitimate concern. We told Rhodes and Richardson that they are an integral part of a growing national movement. For, in a range of work settings, there are men and women who continue to battle in the cause of a viable democratic society where citizens will not sit idly back while lawless acts threaten the safety and resources of their communities. Although no one can sugar-coat the harsh reality of disrupted ca

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