Personality, Styles and Brief Psychotherapy

By Mardi Horowitz; Charles Marmar et al. | Go to book overview

9
CHANGE IN BRIEF
PSYCHOTHERAPY

OUR APPROACH to brief therapy, described in chapter 2, is problem-focused. Personality style is seen as an important factor in understanding symptom formation, therapeutic technique, and syndrome resolution. Our dynamic approach may also facilitate modification of some personality features. However, there are other approaches to brief therapy that aim more centrally at major personality change by focusing on character analysis. These approaches were described in chapter 1. In this final chapter we wish to address the question of the degree to which, in addition to symptomatic change, character change may occur.

Since the primary aim of our brief therapy approach is to improve immediate adaptation, and to analyze character only as it involves an impediment to this goal, our experience is in no way a test of what might be accomplished with a different technique. Nonetheless, our experiences in carefully reviewing cases are fairly unique, and it is not inappropriate to offer our opinions on change, based as they are on the information we had available. These opinions are based on our reviews of our larger archive as well as the representative cases presented here. Since our configurational analysis method provides some useful ways of thinking about change, we shall take up that topic according to the points of view, now familiar to the reader, that were used to formulate pre- and post‐ therapy status as well as the therapeutic process in the various case pre

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