Women and Mental Health

By Elizabeth Howell; Marjorie Bayes | Go to book overview

Purpose and Organization

Women and Mental Health is intended to serve as a resource for those who would like to know more about issues important to the treatment of female clients within mental health services. It consists of six parts, spanning pertinent issues for women in mental health services. Each begins with a general chapter written by the editors. These chapters provide background material and orient the reader to critical issues in the area. Each part ends with a supplementary reading list. The entries cited therein include literature that we would have liked to reprint had space permitted, "landmark" material that is of particular significance, and literature dealing with specific issues in depth.

The book begins with a theoretical background: Part I includes theoretical papers on female development, on the development of gender‐ role stereotypes, and on female socialization. Part II addresses general issues of sexism in mental health, presenting papers about sexist bias of therapists, discriminatory treatment of female clients, and the overprescription of psychotropic drugs to women. Part III addresses issues of diagnosis and psychopathology as they are influenced by gender and discusses syndromes that tend to be female-linked, such as anorexia, depression, and hysteria. Part IV provides comprehensive material on specific treatment needs of women, such as those stemming from developmental crises and those brought on by such trauma as rape, abortion, and battering. The importance of these needs within the mental health services delivered to women is evident by a glance at the entries in this section. The papers collected in Part V, "Therapies," address feminist versus traditional therapies and gender issues relevant to the different therapeutic modalities. The sixth and concluding part, "Where Do We Go from Here?," presents papers that discuss recent changes in the field of women's mental health, changes in process, and changes that still need to be made in our practice and in our thinking about women clients.

By now it should be clear that the papers within the collection do not comprise a complete psychology of women and do not present a perfected therapeutic approach. Much work remains to be done. However, we believe that the papers provide some of the most helpful and thoughtful contributions to the field to date.

-xii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and Mental Health
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 654

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.