The Nazi Persecution of the Churches, 1933-45

By J. S. Conway | Go to book overview

Appendix 2: A Radio Broadcast by General
Superintendent O. Dibelius

(Reprinted from Reichsanzeiger, Nr. 8, 6 April 1933)


EVANGELICAL APPEAL TO AMERICA

General Superintendent D. Dibelius and Methodist Bishop D. Dr Ruelsen spoke in a German short wave transmission.

In a talk, transmitted by the German short wave station to America on Tuesday evening, General Superintendent Dr Dibelius, of Berlin, addressed himself to the American public to take a stand against the atrocity propaganda, and to inform Christians across the ocean of the true situation in Germany. The introductory words were spoken by the Senior Bishop of the Episcopal Methodist Church, Dr Ruelsen, who has been staying in Germany for several days and who after audiences with Reich Ministers Dr. Neurath and Dr. Goebbels has thoroughly acquainted himself with the conditions in Germany. A Methodist statement on the situation was wired to England and America under the direction of D. Ruelsen on 30 March. It ran as follows:

The undersigned leaders of the Methodist Church in Germany enter a strong protest against the public meetings and the press reports in America and England about alleged prosecutions of Jews and atrocities by the National movement in Germany. They see in this the attempt to revive the dreadful atrocity propaganda of the World War from which the psyche of the nations has scarcely freed itself. Under these conditions the endeavours for an understanding between the nations must be most heavily endangered. Apart from few slips by individual and irresponsible persons, against whom the new government has

-342-

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