The Nazi Persecution of the Churches, 1933-45

By J. S. Conway | Go to book overview

Appendix 18: A Telegram from the
Ecclesiastical Council of the German
Evangelical Church to the Führer

(Printed from Kirchliches Jahrbuch 1933-44 (Gütersloh 1948) p. 478-9)

The Ecclesiastical Council of the German Evangelical Church, convened for the first time since the beginning of the decisive combat in the East, assures you, my Führer, in these fascinatingly stirring hours once again of the unshakable loyalty and readiness for service of the entire Evangelical Christendom in Germany. You have, my Führer, staved off the Bolshevist peril in our country and are now calling our nation and the nations of Europe to the decisive passage of arms against the deadly enemy of all order and all European—Christian civilization. The German nation and with it all its Christian members thank you for this deed. Since British policy now aligns itself as an ally of Bolshevism against the Reich, this is an ultimate sign that it is not concerned about Christianity, but only with the annihilation of the German nation. May Almighty God assist you and our nation against the double enemy. The victory shall be ours, to gain which must be the main point of our aspirations and actions.

In this hour the Evangelical Church in Germany honours the Baltic Evangelical martyrs of 1918; she thinks of the unspeakable affliction which Bolshevism wanted to inflict upon all other nations just as it had done with the nations in its own sphere of power, and in all her prayers she is with you and with our peerless soldiers who now are about to eliminate the root of this pestilence with heavy blows. She prays that under your leadership a new order may come into existence all over Europe and that an end will be put to all internal decomposition, to all soiling of the Holiest, and to all desecration of freedom of conscience.

Charlottenburg, 30 June 1941.

-398-

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