War on Two Fronts: Shiloh to Gettysburg

By John Cannan | Go to book overview

FREDERICK L. HITCHCOCK


Misadventures in the Wilderness

A nine months regiment mustered into service in August 1862, the 132nd Pennsylvania fought its last battle at Chancellorsville. Serving with the Third Brigade of French's division in the II Corps, the 132nd was heavily engaged on the Federal center.

On April 28 our corps broke camp and joined the column northward. The winter's rest had brought some accessions to our ranks from the sick and wounded, though the severe picket duty and the excessively damp weather had given us a large sick list. We had, to start with, upward of three hundred and seventy-five men, to which was added some twenty‐ five or thirty from the sick list, who came up to us on the march. It is a curious fact that many men left sick in camp, unable to march with the regiment leave, will get themselves together after the former has been gone a few hours and pull out to overtake it. I saw men crying like children because the surgeon had forbidden them going with the regiment. The loneliness and homesickness, or whatever you please to call it, after the regiment has gone are too much for them. They simply cannot endure it, and so they strike out and follow. They will start by easy marches, and they generally improve in health from the moment they start. Courage and nerve are both summoned for the effort, and the result is that at the end of the second or third day they rejoin the regiment and report for duty. This does not mean that they were not really sick, but that will power and exercise have beaten the disease. I have heard many a sick man say he would rather die than be left behind.

We marched about six miles the first day, much of our route being through a wooded country, some of it so wet and spongy that corduroy roads had to be built for the wagons and artillery. The army can, as a rule, move as rapidly as it can move its artillery and supply trains, and no faster. Of course, for short distances and special expeditions, where

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War on Two Fronts: Shiloh to Gettysburg
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface to the Series 9
  • Chapter I - Fort Henry and Fort Donelson *
  • Gunboats on the Tennessee 13
  • The Defense of Fort Donelson 18
  • Fort Donelson Surrenders 27
  • Chapter II - Pea Ridge *
  • Bloody Arkansas 56
  • Chapter III - Shiloh *
  • U.S. Grant Shiloh 62
  • Shiloha Private's View 76
  • Behind Confederate Lines 89
  • Drummer Boy of Shiloh 103
  • Chapter IX - Kentucky Invaded *
  • The Iuka-Corinth Campaign 106
  • A Yankee in Mississippi 125
  • My Old Kentucky Home 135
  • When Johnny Comes Marching Home 136
  • Chapter V - Vicksburg *
  • The Perryville Campaign 138
  • Charge of the First Tennessee at Perryville 161
  • On to Vicksburg.. 165
  • Champion Hills and Black River 178
  • Capturing Vicksburg 190
  • Treating the Wounded at Vicksburg 203
  • Chapter VI - Chancellorsville *
  • Hooker Takes Command 214
  • The Chancellorsville Campaign 222
  • Lee Triumphant 238
  • Routing the Yankees 271
  • Jackson's Mortal Wound 283
  • Misadventures in the Wilderness 292
  • Behind Confederate Lines 302
  • Chapter VII - The Road to Gettysburg *
  • Riding with J.E.B Stuart 310
  • On to Gettysburg 326
  • The Iron Brigade's Great Battle 330
  • Chapter VIII - The Second Day of Slaughter *
  • Gettysburgthe Second Day 342
  • The Stand of the 20th Maine 357
  • Until God Stopped Them.. 365
  • Both Sides Were Whipped .. 371
  • On the Attack against Sickles 375
  • Under Fire 383
  • Chapter IX - Highwater Mark of the Confederacy *
  • In Pickett's Ranks 390
  • All This Has Been My Fault.. 395
  • Retreat from Gettysburg 401
  • The Girl I Left behind 411
  • When This Cruel War Is over 412
  • Sources 413
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