6
UNEMPLOYMENT IN
THE UNITED STATES

Charles C. Killingsworth

The people of the United States produced more, earned more, and spent more in 1964 than in any other year in their history. By almost any measure, 1964 was a year of record prosperity. Yet unemployment averaged around 5 per cent of the labor force as it had in each of the past seven years. A dozen years ago, most U.S. economists would have defined full employment to mean unemployment of not more than 3 per cent, and that is, in fact, the rate that we achieved for an extended period early in the 1950's. Most of the other highly industrialized nations of the world today have rates of unemployment substantially lower than those that have prevailed in the United States in recent years.

Exact comparisons are difficult to make, of course, because statistical methods vary from country to country. In the United States, for example, the unemployed include those temporarily laid off from regular jobs as well as the long-term unemployed, teenagers seeking their first jobs, those seeking part-time employment, and people who are moving from one job to another. It also can be noted that not everyone who is unemployed is necessarily needy. Most short-term unemployment is covered by unemployment insurance and often, while one member of a family is unemployed, another may be working. But even so, hardly any responsible person in this country believes that we should accept a 5 per cent unemployment rate as a satisfactory state of affairs. An average rate which is that high means much higher rates for certain disadvantaged groups in our society. In recent years, young workers, old workers, low-skilled and poorly educated workers, and Negroes have had unemployment rates considerably higher than the average.

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Labor in a Changing America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 341

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.