Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide

By Edward E. Scannell; Les Donaldson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
Determining
Training Needs

Training won't solve all problems.
Not all problems are training problems
.

The novice trainer is well advised to remember these two statements. Ambitious practitioners, anxious to make their presence known to new employers, may be prone to suggest training as the panacea for all the organization's ills. Usually, however, this is not the case.

Training programs should be offered as a response to a need, not merely as a quick, sure-fire solution to a given problem. It may well be that the solutions to these problems may be found in the area of personnel, product, promotion, or production. These, and a host of other factors, should be explored before embarking on the training program.


Basic Training Areas

The three basic areas involved in performance are the generally accepted types of learning: cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (attitudes).

A person must have the basic conceptual knowledge of what is to he done on the job, the rationale for the job, and what the results of doing the job will be. Cognitive understanding of how to perform the job is equally important.

The second basic area, the skills or psychomotor area, relates to motor or manual skills. This area includes specific physical movements and actions that people take in the performance of their jobs. Often trainers can play an important role in increasing productivity through training activities that shorten the number of movements and actions or that establish new movements that are more productive than the old ones. Work simplification programs, for example, continually attempt to find a "better way."

-20-

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Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - So You're Going to be a Trainer 4
  • Chapter 2 - Designing Effective Training Programs 14
  • Chapter 3 - Determining Training Needs 20
  • Chapter 4 - Instructional Objectives 32
  • Chapter 5 - Lesson Planning 40
  • Chapter 6 - Methods of Instruction 49
  • Chapter 7 - Audiovisuals in Training 59
  • Chapter 8 - Computer-Assisted Training 72
  • Chapter 9 - Communication 80
  • Chapter 10 - Principles of Learning 93
  • Chapter 11 - Motivation 101
  • Chapter 12 - Facilitation Skills 114
  • Chapter 13 - Presentation Skills 120
  • Chapter 14 - Planning a Meeting 129
  • Chapter 15 - Conducting a Meeting 140
  • Chapter 16 - Experiential Learning Activities 153
  • Chapter 17 - Problem Participants 161
  • Chapter 18 - Evaluation 165
  • Chapter 19 - The All-Star Trainer 183
  • Selected References 192
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