Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide

By Edward E. Scannell; Les Donaldson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 10
Principles of Learning

OK, here I am—learn me 'sumthin'!

Hopefully, you will never hear a trainee communicate that verbally, but you may "see" a trainee communicate it nonverbally!

Our purpose in this chapter is to look at the field of adult learning in a very basic way and present to you—in a practical manner-theory and research findings about the way we learn. Some trainers are afraid to discuss the principles of learning because they hesitate to get involved in the maze of educational theories. You will soon see why these fears are unfounded because much of what we know about the way we learn is based on common sense and thoughtful application. Let's start.


Some Definitions

Before we get too involved with principles and learning, let's begin with some understanding of these two terms. A quick check of the dictionary shows:

Principle: a general truth or law, basic to other truths; a comprehensive or fundamental law, doctrine, or assumption.

Learning: knowledge obtained by study; the act of acquiring knowledge or skill; a mental activity by means of which skills, habits, ideas, attitudes, and ideals are acquired, retained, and utilized, resulting in the progressive adaptation and modification of behavior.

Learning is a lifelong process in which experience leads to changes within the individual. It has also been defined as self-development through self-activity. Learning is a change in behavior resulting from experience. In brief, learning means change!


Change

For many people, this change in behavior causes concern. As a matter of fact, for many trainees (and trainers!), any change is uncomfortable. It is a well-known fact

-93-

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Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - So You're Going to be a Trainer 4
  • Chapter 2 - Designing Effective Training Programs 14
  • Chapter 3 - Determining Training Needs 20
  • Chapter 4 - Instructional Objectives 32
  • Chapter 5 - Lesson Planning 40
  • Chapter 6 - Methods of Instruction 49
  • Chapter 7 - Audiovisuals in Training 59
  • Chapter 8 - Computer-Assisted Training 72
  • Chapter 9 - Communication 80
  • Chapter 10 - Principles of Learning 93
  • Chapter 11 - Motivation 101
  • Chapter 12 - Facilitation Skills 114
  • Chapter 13 - Presentation Skills 120
  • Chapter 14 - Planning a Meeting 129
  • Chapter 15 - Conducting a Meeting 140
  • Chapter 16 - Experiential Learning Activities 153
  • Chapter 17 - Problem Participants 161
  • Chapter 18 - Evaluation 165
  • Chapter 19 - The All-Star Trainer 183
  • Selected References 192
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