Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide

By Edward E. Scannell; Les Donaldson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 17
Problem Participants

Where'd I lose control?

There comes a time in every trainer's life when something goes wrong! Sometimes these things are beyond the trainer's control—most times, they are not.

This chapter will introduce several potential problem areas or pesky personalities that may surface on occasion.

Let's agree at the start that by far the majority of people in your session will be positive, friendly, and supportive of your efforts. But it would be naive to suggest that this is always the case. Let's prepare for those rare situations so you'll know how to handle them if they ever come up.

We'll start by looking at a few situations that may arise during a training session, then we'll discuss some types of distracting or "people-problem" areas.


Handling Problems

Speeding Up the Session

This common problem occurs in a number of training meetings. Maybe the people just can't seem to get fired up about the problem under discussion. If you find silent faces, you might call on individuals by name for their responses. You occasionally may even want to misstate a reply on the part of a respondent, which should bring additional comments from others in the room. Many times your frank comment that things are moving too slowly will spark some of the people to get the session back on the beam. If a comment provokes a quizzical stare or shaking of a head in disagreement, call on that person to ask how he/she feels about the comment. You can also use debatable questions to get things moving. Finally, if your items are moving along too slowly, merely move to another point.

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Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - So You're Going to be a Trainer 4
  • Chapter 2 - Designing Effective Training Programs 14
  • Chapter 3 - Determining Training Needs 20
  • Chapter 4 - Instructional Objectives 32
  • Chapter 5 - Lesson Planning 40
  • Chapter 6 - Methods of Instruction 49
  • Chapter 7 - Audiovisuals in Training 59
  • Chapter 8 - Computer-Assisted Training 72
  • Chapter 9 - Communication 80
  • Chapter 10 - Principles of Learning 93
  • Chapter 11 - Motivation 101
  • Chapter 12 - Facilitation Skills 114
  • Chapter 13 - Presentation Skills 120
  • Chapter 14 - Planning a Meeting 129
  • Chapter 15 - Conducting a Meeting 140
  • Chapter 16 - Experiential Learning Activities 153
  • Chapter 17 - Problem Participants 161
  • Chapter 18 - Evaluation 165
  • Chapter 19 - The All-Star Trainer 183
  • Selected References 192
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