Human Services Management: Organizational Leadership in Social Work Practice

By David M. Austin | Go to book overview

ONE
INTRODUCTION

But let us look further at the essentials of leadership. Of the greatest importance is the ability to grasp a total situation. The chief mistake in thinking of leadership as resting wholly on personality lies probably in the fact that the executive leader is not a leader of men only but of something we are learning to call the total situation. This includes facts, present and potential, aims and purposes and men. Out of a welter of facts, experience, desires, aims, a leader must find the unifying thread. He must see a whole, not a kaleidoscope of pieces. He must see the relation between all the different factors in a situation. The higher up you go, the more ability you have to have of this kind, because you have a wider range of facts from which to seize the relations.

—Mary Parker Follett (Graham 1995:168)

WE LIVE in a world of organizations in the United States at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Society is governed through a complex network of international, national, state, and local political/governmental organizations. Goods and services that are part of everyday living are obtained through organizational systems that reach around the world. Growing up, to a large degree, is growing up in a world of educational organizations. For most individuals, working in or with an organization is a central feature of their adult years, organizations that may be very large and impersonal or that may be small and intimate. Organizational arrangements of many types shape retirement years. In the world of organizations, the shift from an industrial society to the postindustrial society is a shift from goods-producing organizations to service-producing organizations (Bell 1973) and, increasingly, information-producing organizations.

Persons who work in, or through, human service organizations—social workers, nurses, physicians, lawyers, teachers, psychologists, counselors, clergy—spend much of their time with organizations, either the organization that they work in, or the organizations they deal with as part of their

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Services Management: Organizational Leadership in Social Work Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • One - Introduction 1
  • Two - Human Service Organizations 30
  • Three - Stakeholder Constituencies 59
  • Four - Organizational Structure and Program Design 89
  • Five - Service Delivery Networks 138
  • Six - The User/consumer Constituency 184
  • Seven - Organized Professions and Human Service Organizations 216
  • Eight - Legitimators and Funders 281
  • Nine - The Human Service Executive 322
  • Ten - Boards of Directors and Advisory Committees 354
  • Eleven - Accountability 396
  • Twelve - Dealing with Change 423
  • References 449
  • Index 479
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 513

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.