Human Services Management: Organizational Leadership in Social Work Practice

By David M. Austin | Go to book overview

FIVE
SERVICE DELIVERY NETWORKS

The forces that most influence organizations come from outside the organization, not from within.

—Drucker (1998:174)

Alliances that both partners ultimately deem successful involve collaboration (creating new values together) rather than mere exchange (getting something back for what you put in). Partners value the skills each brings to the alliance.

—Rosabeth Moss Kanter (1997:225)

THE MANAGEMENT of any organization involves dealing with the external environment as well as with internal organizational processes. For human service organizations, a significant element in the external environment is the human service delivery network (hereafter referred as a service delivery network)—that is, that set of organizations that are involved in providing a particular type of service within a given community (Hage 1986; Austin 1991; Reitan 1998). To a large degree, the way in which any single service organization develops over time is shaped by the characteristics of the service delivery networks that the organization is a part of. The literature dealing with human service programs emphasizes the importance of “coordination” or “integration” of service providers (Reitan 1998) to improve the outcomes for service users, particularly for those with complex, multiple, or long-term service requirements. Nugent and Glisson, in a study of children in the juvenile justice system who have mental health problems, point out, “Characteristics of service systems clearly impact the outcomes of services” (1999:57). This chapter provides a framework for understanding the characteristics and dynamics of the service delivery networks with which organizational managers and other staff members are involved.

Businesses are involved in supplier chains, or networks, and marketing networks. They are also likely to be involved in technology networks, personnel networks, stock ownership networks, and political influence

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human Services Management: Organizational Leadership in Social Work Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • One - Introduction 1
  • Two - Human Service Organizations 30
  • Three - Stakeholder Constituencies 59
  • Four - Organizational Structure and Program Design 89
  • Five - Service Delivery Networks 138
  • Six - The User/consumer Constituency 184
  • Seven - Organized Professions and Human Service Organizations 216
  • Eight - Legitimators and Funders 281
  • Nine - The Human Service Executive 322
  • Ten - Boards of Directors and Advisory Committees 354
  • Eleven - Accountability 396
  • Twelve - Dealing with Change 423
  • References 449
  • Index 479
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 513

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.