Margaret Fuller, Critic: Writings from the New-York Tribune, 1844-1846

By Judith Mattson Bean; Joel Myerson | Go to book overview

TEXTUAL NOTE

This edition of Margaret Fuller's writings in the New-York Tribune prints annotated texts for 88 of the 250 pieces she published in the New-York Tribune between 7 December 1844 and 8 August 1846. 1 All 250 pieces are included in the electronic edition. Of these, only 38 (or about 15 percent) have been reprinted in twentieth-century editions. The other 212 texts are in a hard-tolocate and hard-to-read newspaper. We hope that our edition will assist new scholarship on Fuller by presenting for the first time in a modern edition the nearly two years of her creative output in the Tribune.

After her death, Fuller's writings were collected by her brother Arthur (with occasional help from Horace Greeley) as Woman in the Nineteenth Century, and Kindred Papers (1855), At Home and Abroad (1856), and Life Without and Life Within (1860). Unfortunately, he chose very selectively from the materials available, “improved” his sister's writing by revising what he thought ungraceful style, and deleted what he considered irrelevant (or “inappropriate”) examples and passages.

Our edition presents Fuller's texts as she wrote them for publication in the New-York Tribune. These texts, written under the pressure of deadlines and set by compositors who may not have always been able to read Fuller's handwriting, and for a medium that does not encourage leisurely proofreading, are nevertheless surprisingly free of error. Our textual policy is simple: we print the texts as they appeared in the Tribune. Emendations have been made in cases of obvious typographical errors or misspellings, or when clarity of thought is disturbed. All emendations are reported by placing a superscript “n” in the text immediately following the word emended (as in “wordn”), with a description of the original reading provided in the footnotes. No attempt has been made to regularize Fuller's spelling and punctuation practices, or to modernize archaic spellings. The text is as close to Fuller's intentions as is possible. Some typographical features, such as the use of large and small capitals in the first word(s) of an article have been changed to regular upper-and lowercase let-

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