The New Dealers' War: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the War within World War II

By Thomas Fleming | Go to book overview

9
FALL OF A PROPHET

Throughout the winter and spring of 1943, Henry Wallace and his chief lieutenant on the Board of Economic Warfare, Milo Perkins, waged an increasingly bitter war with Jesse Jones, secretary of commerce and head of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. They quarreled repeatedly over the pace of Jones's response to requests for money for BEW purchases and programs, and occasionally over the nature of the programs themselves. When the State Department dragged its feet on issuing passports to BEW administrators assigned overseas, Perkins and Wallace saw a conspiracy between Jones and his fellow conservative Cordell Hull.

Wallace sought FDR's backing in this growing feud. In a conversation at the end of 1942, the vice president had warned the president that the nation's liberals saw the conflict as a symbolic clash between the New Deal and its conservative foes. It was becoming a test of the president's commitment to liberalism. Wal

-214-

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The New Dealers' War: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the War within World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments i
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - The Big Leak i
  • 2 - The Big Leaker 25
  • 3 - From Triumph to Trauma 49
  • 4 - The Great Dichotomy 92
  • 5 - Whose War Is It Anyway? 115
  • 6 - Some Neglected Chickens Come Home to Roost 135
  • 7 - In Search of Unconditional Purity 165
  • 8 - War War Leads to Jaw Jaw 189
  • 9 - Fall of a Prophet 214
  • 10 - What'd You Get, Black Boy? 231
  • 11 - Let My Cry Come Unto Thee 255
  • 12 - Red Star Rising 281
  • 13 - Shaking Hands with Murder 305
  • 14 - Goddamning Roosevelt and Other Pastimes 337
  • 15 - Democracy's Total War 366
  • 16 - Operation Stop Henry 390
  • 17 - Death and Transfiguration in Berlin 420
  • 18 - The Dying Champion 441
  • 19 - Lost Last Stands 473
  • 20 - A New President and an Old Policy 514
  • 21 - Ashes of Victory 548
  • Notes 563
  • Index 599
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