Rhetoric and Reality in Air Warfare: The Evolution of British and American Ideas about Strategic Bombing, 1914-1945

By Tami Davis Biddle | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

WHEN I was a freshman in college, Carey Joynt convinced me that women could and should study national security policy—and then encouraged me to follow that path. Philip Towle furthered my interest in the topic. I have been blessed with unusually attentive and supportive mentors—scholars who take their teaching role very seriously—both during my graduate training and while a junior faculty member. Gaddis Smith made me want to become a historian, made sure I had a chance to become one, and then encouraged me all through graduate school. Paul Kennedy, who advised this project when it was a doctoral thesis, was an inspired role model for me in every sense. My Duke colleague Alex Roland has been no less an inspiring role model, and has helped to make working in the field of military history both a pleasure and a privilege. I thank him for his unfailing willingness to read drafts of my work and to offer—always—incisive advice.

Those who aided me and influenced my thinking in the early stages of this project include: Ashton Carter, Stephen Van Evera, Sir Michael Howard, Robert O'Neill, Noble Frankland, Ramsay D. Potts, David MacIsaac, and the late Lord Zuckerman. I am particularly indebted to Air Commodore Henry Probert, RAF (ret.), former head of the Air Historical Branch, RAF, who offered patient guidance to a novice researcher who first turned up in his office many years ago.

No project of this nature can be undertaken without substantial financial assistance. For their support of my work over the years I am greatly indebted to: Yale University, the Social Science Research Council, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, the U.S. Air Force Historical Research Center, The Brookings Institution, the National Air and Space Museum, and Duke University. Luke Arant, Lisa Kellmeyer, and D'Arcy Brissman provided able research assistance; Wayne Lee helped bring me into the computer age. Teresa Lawson and Kathy Goldgeier offered excellent editorial guidance on the final manuscript. I thank the U.S. Army's Military History Institute for support through the Harold K. Johnson Visiting Professorship, 2001–2002.

Over the years I have benefited enormously from the resources and assistance made available to me by the staffs of the Air Historical Branch, RAF (UK), the Office of Air Force History (USA), the Air Force Historical Research Center (USA), the RAF Museum (UK), the National Air and Space Museum (USA), the National Defence Headquarters (Canada), the Library of Congress (USA), the Public Record Office

-vii-

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Rhetoric and Reality in Air Warfare: The Evolution of British and American Ideas about Strategic Bombing, 1914-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Rhetoric and Reality in Air Warfare *
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - The Beginning: Strategic Bombing in the First World War 11
  • Chapter Two - Britain in the Interwar Years 69
  • Chapter Three - The United States in the Interwar Years 128
  • Chapter Four - Rhetoric and Reality, 1939–1942 176
  • Chapter Five - The Combined Bomber Offensive: 1943–1945 214
  • Conclusion 289
  • Notes 303
  • Bibliography of Archival Sources 387
  • Index 391
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