Rhetoric and Reality in Air Warfare: The Evolution of British and American Ideas about Strategic Bombing, 1914-1945

By Tami Davis Biddle | Go to book overview

Index
AAF Proving Grounds (Florida), 240
ACTS (Air Corps Tactical School) [U.S.]: “Air Force” text of, 155–64, 167, 168, 349n.120; analysis of W.W. I strategic bombing by, 156; “Bombardment” text of, 166–67, 169, 174; bomber survivability tensions at, 166–67; emphasis on bombing (1930s) by, 164; establishment of, 131; evolution of, 153–64; influence on W.W. II strategic bombing by, 205– 6; “precision bombing” of targets orientation of, 161; Spanish civil war lecture at, 171; thinking on Japanese cities in, 261; training through, 138–39
ADGB March exercise (1932), 107
ADGB March exercise (1933), 99, 100– 101
Advisory Committee on London Casualty Organization report (1938), 109–10
“Aerial Ships” (Lana), 12
Air Battalion of the Royal Engineers, 20
Air Committee of CID (Committee of Imperial Defense), 20
Air Corps Bill (U.S., 1926), 138
Air Corps Newsletter (U.S. Air Corps), 144, 146, 155, 172
Air Corps (U.S.): ACTS training of officers in, 138–39; bombing objectives of, 162–64; emphasis on bombers (1930s) by, 164–70; during entrance into W.W. II, 177–78; evolution of interwar aerial warfare thought, 153–64; GHQ central control over strikes by, 142–43; increasing expenditures (1930s) of, 145–46; influence of science/technical thinking on, 163–64; intelligence gathering on Japanese economic targets by, 262; interwar progress/problems in, 138–47; MacArthur-Pratt agreement (1931), 143–44; publicity surrounding annual maneuvers by, 148–49; redesignation (1926) as, 138; regarding civilian targets and moral effect, 139–41. See also USAAF (United States Army Air Forces)
Air Council (Great Britain), 34
aircraft: B-10 bombers, 146; B-17 bombers, 146–47, 203, 207, 240; B-29 bombers, 263, 265, 266, 267–68; bombers vs. fighters trials (1927), 89– 91; bombers vs. fighters trials (1934), 168; British entry into World War II, 183–85; defensive mission of pre–W.W. II U.S., 129; differences between MB-2 and Martin B-10 bombers, 146; German W.W. I raids using Gotha/Giant, 29–35, 72, 74–75, 78–79; government and military response to advent of, 289–301; H2X-equipped bombers, 228–29, 243, 244; Inskip program (1937) for British, 121; prototype YB-17, 146; RAF support leading to effective W.W. II, 113; technology of 1930s and development of U.S., 165; U.S. interest in Spanish civil war, 173; U.S. production (1940) of, 204; W.W. I DH4, 53; W.W. I DH9, 41, 42; W.W. II H2X, 228–29; YB-40 bomber escort cruiser, 227. See also zeppelin campaign (1914–18)
aircraft industry: interwar development of British, 86–88, 111; production capabilities (1917) of, 320n.214; Roosevelt's output directive to U.S., 204; USAAF information on production by, 206
Air Force Constitution Bill (Great Britain, 1917), 34
Air Force Magazine,299
“Air Force” text (ACTS), 155–64, 167, 168, 349n.120, 350n.126
Air Ministry: BBSU and BBRM bombing assessments planned by, 273; efforts against banning bombers (1930s) by, 103, 108; on German civilian casualties, 366n.27; Harris memo (1944) countered by, 233; hopes for W.A.5 by, 180; joint bombing statement (1945) by USSTAF and, 270–71; Joubert's suggestions (1933) to, 101; on question of escort fighters (1930s), 118, 119;

-391-

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Rhetoric and Reality in Air Warfare: The Evolution of British and American Ideas about Strategic Bombing, 1914-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Rhetoric and Reality in Air Warfare *
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - The Beginning: Strategic Bombing in the First World War 11
  • Chapter Two - Britain in the Interwar Years 69
  • Chapter Three - The United States in the Interwar Years 128
  • Chapter Four - Rhetoric and Reality, 1939–1942 176
  • Chapter Five - The Combined Bomber Offensive: 1943–1945 214
  • Conclusion 289
  • Notes 303
  • Bibliography of Archival Sources 387
  • Index 391
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