Social Work Practice with Immigrants and Refugees

By Pallassana R. Balgopal | Go to book overview

PREFACE

From its inception, the United States has been a land of immigrants. Likewise, the field of social work has a long history of working with immigrants and refugees. In the nineteenth century, charity organizations and missions assisted with social welfare services to immigrants and their families, and at the beginning of the social work profession, the “friendly visitor” helped families in need. The settlement house movement in the late nineteenth century focused on improving the environment and quality of life by teaching English and American values to the immigrant communities. Neighborhood centers were opened all over the United States, providing a variety of services.

During its first years, the majority of immigrants to the United States were from Europe, plus those individuals who were brought from Africa by force as slaves. The long-standing quota system regulating the number of immigrants from each country was finally abolished with the passage of the Immigration Act of 1965, resulting in increased numbers of immigrants from Asia and Latin America. Then the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 enabled illegal immigrants who had been in the United States for more than five years to claim legal residence.

The United States has long welcomed refugees fleeing persecution, war, or natural disaster. Historically, the expectation has been that immigrants and refugees would learn and adopt American values, norms, and the English language as their way of life. But this has been difficult for many people, and instead, a blend of new cultures has been the result. This idea of a “melting pot” is that the immigrants' traditions are combined with Anglo-American customs to

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Work Practice with Immigrants and Refugees
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 265

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.