Sound Technology and the American Cinema: Perception, Representation, Modernity

By James Lastra; John Belton | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Like most projects, this book could not have been accomplished without the aid of many others in matters both large and small. From its first hesitant drafts in 1989, until its completion ten years later, this book has benefited from the wise counsel offered by friends, colleagues, and teachers in several different places and institutions. The earliest versions of the ideas set forth here were written at the University of Iowa. My debt to teachers and fellow students there is enormous. Professors Dudley Andrew, John Peters, Lauren Rabinovitz, and Steven Ungar all made valuable and irreplaceable contributions to its early growth, as did fellow students Charles O'Brien, Steve Wurtzler, Dana Benelli, Scott Curtis, Pieter Pereboom, Greg Easley, and James McLaughlin. I am grateful for the many enlightening conversations I have had during my many return trips to Iowa City since graduation, especially those with the members of the Sound Research Seminar.

My greatest Iowa debt, however, is to Rick Altman, without whose camaraderie, insight, and constant intellectual challenges neither the dissertation nor the book would have been written. Rick's influence is evident on every page, and it would be a far poorer book were it not for his inspiration, his criticism, and, most of all, his friendship.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Warner Bros. Archives at the University of Southern California aided my research immeasurably. I would especially like to thank Valentin Almendarez, Barbara Hall, Scott Curtis, and Stuart Eng for their kind, and usually crucial, assistance. The

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