Sound Technology and the American Cinema: Perception, Representation, Modernity

By James Lastra; John Belton | Go to book overview

staffs at the Chicago Public Library and the Special Collections Departments of the Joseph Regenstein and John Crerar Libraries at the University of Chicago were unfailingly helpful, in spite of the frequent obscurity of my requests.

Don Crafton, Mary Ann Doane, Martin Jay, Tom Levin, Terry Smith, Chuck Wolfe, and Ed Branigan deserve special thanks for reading and listening to all or parts of this book and for making significant criticisms, suggestions, and contributions over the past few years. At Columbia University Press, I have had the privilege to work with John Belton, Jennifer Crewe, and Roy Thomas, who have been unfailingly patient, even when disasters repeatedly hit.

The intellectual generosity of my colleagues at the University of Chicago has been remarkable and touching. Tom Gunning, simply put, changed the nature of the project through his comments, encouragement, and intellectual guidance. Jim Chandler, Tom Mitchell, Katie Trumpener, and Bill Brown provided invaluable help with particularly knotty issues. Josh Scodel and Lisa Ruddick offered sound advice on structure and rhetoric. Students too numerous to mention served as sounding boards for ideas not yet committed to print, and hammered them into shape in class discussion.

My deepest affection and respect go to Miriam Hansen, who has done more to shape my life and work over the past few years than I can adequately express. Intellectually fearless, committed, brilliant, and original, she has served as a model for what a scholar and a teacher should be. I have learned form her not only how to be a better academic but also how to be a better colleague. More important, she has shown me what it means to have strength, integrity, and wisdom. The book spends a great deal of time pondering the inhuman. Miriam has expanded my understanding of what it means to be truly human.

Finally, I would like to thank my family for their unflagging love and support over the past few, difficult, years. My mother, Jean, and sister, Joan, helped in thousands of small but essential ways, and encouraged me at all the right times. My wife, Janice, and my children, Charlotte and Paul, above all, have given purpose to the entire enterprise, and joy to my every day. I cannot thank them enough. I dedicate this book to them and to the memory of James F. Lastra, James McLaughlin, and Michael Altman.

-x-

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