Sound Technology and the American Cinema: Perception, Representation, Modernity

By James Lastra; John Belton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
STANDARDS AND PRACTICES
Aesthetic Norm and Technological Innovation in the
American Cinema

One of the most important characteristics of the classical cinema is surely its stability over time. As I argued in chapter 3, scholars such as David Bordwell, Janet Staiger, and Kristin Thompson have shown how a paradigm of bounded and hierarchically ordered formal options structured filmmaking during the classical period, and how the dominance of a particular form of efficiently conveyed—and profitable—narrative ensured the paradigm's hegemony. They further show how the structure of industrial production ensured the interchangeability of personnel and therefore a kind of stability regarding the practical aspects of filmmaking. 1 While this may be an adequate account of the resulting formal and industrial paradigm, it does not explain how that paradigm came to be internalized by those workers whose everyday task it was to produce the representations on which Hollywood thrived. Although in the abstract it is easy to understand why the economic success of clearly told stories of goal-oriented, heterosexual, middle-class protagonists mandated the paradigm's primacy in a profit-seeking capitalist corporation, and that the formal conventions of what came to be known as classical continuity cinema were especially (if not uniquely) suited to this form, it is more difficult to explain how the representational assumptions and norms necessary to this style of filmmaking came to form the instinctive or obvious solutions to the various representational problems raised by any particular script.

Previous attempts to describe these formal conventions as, for example, a collection of arbitrary “codes” have more often than not led us away from the

-154-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sound Technology and the American Cinema: Perception, Representation, Modernity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.