Thinking Teams, Thinking Clients: Knowledge-Based Teamwork

By Anne Opie | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to record my gratitude to the members of the teams and the families and clients who took part in this research. In a project such as this, their agreement and participation are crucial for the study even to get off the ground. I am also much indebted to the three members of the research advisory group—Maureen Bobbett, Robyn Munford, and Ulla Preston— who provided valuable input at critical times.

I was delighted to be able to work again with Brenda Watson, who produced highly professional transcripts of the audiotaped data, a task that required considerable patience and attention to detail, given the difficulties of transcribing group discussions.

I am greatly indebted to John Michel, executive editor at Columbia University Press, for his positive response to this text. I would like, too, to thank the anonymous readers who commented on the manuscript; one in particular made detailed suggestions that assisted in a substantial revision of some sections of the text.

My family, as always, encouraged, supported, rallied around, and provided help at critical moments. My thanks to Rachel and Joss for their assistance with some mundane but necessary collating and editing tasks. I am especially indebted to Brian, who was, as always, available for lengthy discussions at inconvenient moments over the whole life of the project and, in particular, provided an invaluable, knowledgeable, and close critique of drafts of chapters 2 and 9 and the manuscript of the Sociological Research Online article (incorporated into this text as chapter 7). My debt to my family for their continued love and support (practical and

-vii-

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Thinking Teams, Thinking Clients: Knowledge-Based Teamwork
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Thinking Teams / Thinking Clients *
  • Part One - Thinking Teamwork 1
  • 1 - Mapping the Terrain Ahead 3
  • 2 - Shifting Boundaries 15
  • 3 - The Teams and Their Organizational Locations 53
  • 4 - Theory/site/practice 89
  • Part Two - Displaying Teamwork 111
  • 5 - Achieving a “more Subtle Vision” 113
  • 6 - Making and Shaping Team Discussions 139
  • 7 - Narrative and Knowledge Creation in Case Discussions 185
  • 8 - Clients' Empowerment in Interprofessional Teamwork 225
  • 9 - Performing Knowledge Work 253
  • Appendix - Transcription Conventions 269
  • Notes 271
  • References 283
  • Index 293
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