Thinking Teams, Thinking Clients: Knowledge-Based Teamwork

By Anne Opie | Go to book overview

3
The Teams and Their Organizational Locations

The conditions for the production of effective teamwork are not restricted to ensuring adequate professional training and the production of competent professionals. These are germane factors, although the notion of training is a highly complex one, raising issues of degree, intensity, focus, and appropriateness. What attention to such factors excludes, though, is the importance of the organizational environment in which teamwork is practiced. All teamwork is produced within an organization. My argument is that rather than relying on generalized rhetoric about the value of teamwork, organizations concerned with the production of effective teamwork are necessarily attentive to the conditions under which such work is produced and to what organizational policies and practices are required to support that production (an issue to which I return in some detail in chapter 9). My objective at this point is to discuss the specific difficult organizational environments in which the teams involved in the research conducted their work, environments that were themselves the products of particular international discourses.

This chapter is intended to work simultaneously across two planes. One plane is the contextual or the local. I therefore provide an account of the six multidisciplinary teams in three services at three different sites that were involved in the research, and I outline aspects of the particular organizational settings in which these teams operated. I first comment briefly on some of the more recent changes, driven by neoliberal discourses, in health policy in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Second, drawing attention to the implications of reading “organization” in light of postmodern theory, I take up John Law's (1994) writing on organizational narratives to provide

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Thinking Teams, Thinking Clients: Knowledge-Based Teamwork
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Thinking Teams / Thinking Clients *
  • Part One - Thinking Teamwork 1
  • 1 - Mapping the Terrain Ahead 3
  • 2 - Shifting Boundaries 15
  • 3 - The Teams and Their Organizational Locations 53
  • 4 - Theory/site/practice 89
  • Part Two - Displaying Teamwork 111
  • 5 - Achieving a “more Subtle Vision” 113
  • 6 - Making and Shaping Team Discussions 139
  • 7 - Narrative and Knowledge Creation in Case Discussions 185
  • 8 - Clients' Empowerment in Interprofessional Teamwork 225
  • 9 - Performing Knowledge Work 253
  • Appendix - Transcription Conventions 269
  • Notes 271
  • References 283
  • Index 293
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