The Skull beneath the Skin: Africa after the Cold War

By Mark Huband | Go to book overview

5
A CITY ON THE LAKE

The Creation of Hutu and Tutsi

THE YOUNG MAN I HAD TAKEN from the house in Mahwa had survived. The Red Cross drove to the mission in Butwe and picked him up the day after being told that he might be in danger from the troops at Matana. They took him to the Prince Louis Rwagasore hospital in Bujumbura. The hospital is a long, two- and three-story building along a tree-lined avenue on the eastern side of the capital. The wards were dim and silent. I began to ask a doctor where I might find him and explained unclearly how he had been brought by the Red Cross from south of the city. The doctor had no idea what I was talking about, so I wandered through the wards hoping I might recognize him. At the end of a long room filled with beds surrounded by net curtains, a young man sat on the edge of a bed with a woman sitting beside him. They were both silent. He looked at me without any expression. I asked another doctor whether he was the one who had been brought from Butwe, and the doctor replied that he was. I stood for a minute, wondering what to say. He breathed, almost sighing, saying nothing.

"He hasn't said anything since he came here. This is his sister, who came here when the priest in Butwe said he had been brought to Bujumbura. He hasn't said anything at all." The doctor explained this with his arms crossed over his chest, staring down at the young man, who shifted his weight without changing his expression. The doctor explained to him and his sister who I was. The sister told him in Kirundi she knew who I was, that her brother was fine,

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The Skull beneath the Skin: Africa after the Cold War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Prologue viii
  • Part One - Empty Promises i
  • 1 - Sell the Silver, Steal the Gold 3
  • 2 - The Skull beneath the Skin 31
  • 3 - Great Game, Dirty Game 57
  • Part Two - The Time of the Soldier 79
  • 4 - Whispers and Screams 81
  • 5 - A City on the Lake 97
  • 6 - Juggling the Juntas 115
  • 7 - The Deadly Harvest 137
  • Part Three - Blood of the Ancestors 159
  • 8 - Myths, Chiefs, and Churches 161
  • 9 - Genocide 184
  • 10 - The Spit of the Toad 217
  • Part Four - New World, Old Order 249
  • 11 - Rogue States and Radicals 253
  • 12 - The Mogadishu Line 277
  • 13 - France, Africa, and a Place Called Fashoda 307
  • Epilogue - The Center Cannot Hold 327
  • Notes 335
  • Bibliography 355
  • Index 361
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