When Equality Ends: Stories about Race and Resistance

By Richard Delgado | Go to book overview

6
Conflict as Pathology

What's Wrong with Alternative
Dispute Resolution

I was standing in my pajamas trying to figure how to fold up the little hide-a-bed on which I had spent a surprisingly comfortable night when a familiar voice from behind startled me: "Professor, you're up. Let me give you a hand. How did you sleep?"

My young host deftly snapped the mattress back in place, replaced the couch cushions, and scooped up the bedding, which I had stacked on a nearby chair. "Like a log. I spent a few minutes getting ready for my hearing, then turned in around eleven. How about you two?"

"Fine. We talked for a while about Judge Garza, then called it a night. Did you have any dreams?"

"Not that I can remember. How about you?"

"I actually did," Rodrigo replied. "I don't know if I told you, but Ray and Esmeralda, some good friends of ours, are getting divorced. In my dream, our late friend, Trina Grillo, was warning Esmeralda not to choose mediation. It was one of those mixed-up dreams I sometimes have, with everything out of sequence. I don't think Trina even knew Esmeralda, but she was speaking to her warmly, as though to a friend."

"Oh, what a loss! Trina was a loving, caring person, and, as you know, a leading critic of alternative dispute resolution, particularly for divorcing women. I found her work inspirational."

"Me, too," Rodrigo echoed. "I woke up early, reread her Yale article, 1 and have been thinking about it ever since. Would you like some coffee?"

-127-

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When Equality Ends: Stories about Race and Resistance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1 - Rodrigo's Book Bag 1
  • 2 - Rodrigo's Road Map 27
  • 3 - What's Wrong with Neoliberalism 55
  • 4 - Rodrigo's Chromosomes 79
  • 5 - Latinos and the Black-White Binary 109
  • 6 - Conflict as Pathology 127
  • 7 - Rodrigo's Book of Manners 143
  • 8 - Rodrigo's Committee Assignment 163
  • 9 - The Problem with Lawyers 189
  • 10 - Rodrigo's Notebook 223
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