Jane Addams and the Dream of American Democracy: A Life

By Jean Bethke Elshtain | Go to book overview

4
THE FAMILY CLAIM AND THE
SOCIAL CLAIM

THE DOORS OF HULL-HOUSE OPENED on September 18, 1889.

Jane Addams had spent winter, spring, and summer 1889 in Chicago gathering money, paying social dues, garnering political support, and holding fast to her "scheme." Ellen Gates Starr, to whom she had first revealed the plan during their trip in Europe, 1887-1888, joined her, as did a housekeeper, Mary Keyser, when they took up residence at 335 (later, 800) Halsted Street, destined to become the most famous address in Chicago. In the quiet of the night before her open doors became a reality, Jane Addams no doubt mused on what had brought her to that moment. Convinced as she was that an old order was dying and a new one was struggling to be born, she aimed to contribute to the new by preserving the best of the old and creatively mixing the two.

The passing of an old way of life does not necessarily entail its obliteration, she insisted. Her sense of cultural renewal and moral evolution called for social amelioration, not violent upheaval. No responsible social reformer aims to wipe out all that has gone before. To the contrary, the basis of all progress, she writes, is to revere rather than to revile the best of the past. Addams hoped that "our American civilization might be built without disturbing these foundations [the examples of great civic heroes] which were laid of the old time." 1 The past haunts the present and works itself into its interstices. So it is that the modern woman carries forward in her own way the age-old story of woman as

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jane Addams and the Dream of American Democracy: A Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Also by Jean Bethke Elshtain *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Credits xi
  • Chronology xiii
  • Books by Jane Addams xvii
  • Hull-House Firsts xix
  • Preface - Interpreting a Life xxi
  • Introduction - Looking for Jane Addams's America 1
  • 1 - The Snare of Preparation 15
  • 2 - One Pilgrim's Progress 33
  • 3 - Imagining Hull-House 65
  • 4 - The Family Claim and the Social Claim 89
  • 5 - Compassion without Condescension 119
  • 6 - Woman's Remembering Heart 149
  • 7 - Life Has Marked Us with Its Slow Stain 181
  • 8 - Solidarity Which Will Not Waver 211
  • Afterword 251
  • Notes 255
  • Index 319
  • About the Author 329
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 329

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.