The Unfinished Election of 2000

By Jack N. Rakove | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

HENRY E. BRADY is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy and Director of the Survey Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley. He has also taught at MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. He has written about elections and political participation in the United States, Canada, Eastern Europe, and the former Soviet Union. He is coauthor of Voice and Equality: Civic Voluntarism in American Politics (Harvard University Press, 1995) and Letting the People Decide: The Dynamics of a Canadian Election (Stanford University Press, 1992). In November 2000 he served pro bono as an expert witness in citizen suits in Palm Beach County, Florida, regarding the "butterfly ballot."

JOHN MILTON COOPER, JR., is E. Gordon Fox Professor of American Institutions at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His books include The Warrior and the Priest: Woodrow Wilson and Theodore Roosevelt (1983) and Breaking the Heart of the World: Woodrow Wilson and the Fight for the League of Nations (2001). He is a member of the Center for National Policy and the Council on Foreign Relations and Chief Historian for the television biography of Woodrow Wilson to be broadcast for the American Experience.

STEPHEN HOLMES is Professor of Law at New York University Law School. From 1985 to 1997 he was Professor of Politics and Law at the University of Chicago, and from 1997 to 2000 he was Professor of Politics at Princeton. His fields of specialization include democratic theory, the history of liberalism, constitutional and legal change after communism, the Russian legal system, and

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