Memoirs: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics

By Edward Teller; Judith L. Shoolery | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

MANY PEOPLE ENCOURAGED me to write this book, but four deserve special recognition: Judy Shoolery who, having heard many of these accounts as a friend, persistently pleaded that she not be the only person to know them; Linda G. Regan who as an editor convinced me to commit to the project and then offered suggestions and encouragement for almost a decade; and my son Paul and daughter Wendy, whose interest in and support of this autobiography has been unwavering.

Special thanks are due Hoover Institution for its support during this effort, particularly for making it possible for my collaborator to conduct interviews at Los Alamos and Livermore. I am also most grateful for the advice and counsel that the Hoover directors, W. Glenn Campbell and John Raisian, have offered throughout this period at Hoover. And I thank Directors Roger Batzel, John Nuckolls, and Bruce Tarter of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for their considerable support.

Many friends and acquaintances have consented to be interviewed by Ms. Shoolery or have reminisced with me on one or more occasions. I am grateful to Harold Agnew, Harold and Jean (Anderson) Argo, the late Roger Batzel, John Boyd, Norris and Lois Bradbury, Robert Budwine, W Glenn Campbell, Gregory Canavan, Karl Cohen, Stirling and Rosie Colgate, the late Charles Critchfield and Jean Critchfield, the late G. Foster Evans and Alice Evans, Leona Fernbach, Edward H. Fleming, John Foster, the late Carl Haussmann, John T. Hayward, Roland Herbst, Gerald W Johnson, Arthur Kantrowicz, Rolf Landshoff, Cecil E. Leith, the late Carson Mark and Kay Mark, Hans Mark, Willam G. and Nancy McMillan, the late Nicholas Metropolis, Milo Nordyke, John Nuckolls, Jack and Beverly Peterson, Louis and Mary Rosen, Duane Sewell, Johndale Solem, Wilson Talley, Theodore Taylor, Richard and Mary Taschek, Richard Van Konynenburg, John Wheeler, and Lowell Wood.

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