Strong Managers, Weak Owners: The Political Roots of American Corporate Finance

By Mark J. Roe | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Several chapters here derive from articles that I published previously:

Political and Legal Restraints on Corporate Control, 27 Journal of Financial Economics 7 (1990).

A Political Theory of American Corporate Finance, 91 Columbia Law Review 10 (1991).

Institutional Fiduciaries in the Corporate Boardroom, in Institutional Investors: Challenges and Responsibilities 292 (Irwin 1991).

Political Elements in the Creation of a Mutual Fund Industry, 139 University of Pennsylvania Law Review 1469 (1991).

Foundations of Corporate Finance: The 1906 Pacification of the Insurance Industry, 93 Columbia Law Review 639 (1993).

Understanding the Japanese Keiretsu: Overlaps Between Corporate Governance and Industrial Organization, 102 Yale Law Journal 871 (1993) (with Ronald Gilson).

Takeover Politics, in The Deal Decade 321 (Brookings Institution 1993).

Some Differences in Corporate Structure in Germany, Japan, and the United States, 102 Yale Law Journal 1927 (1993).

The Modern Corporation and Private Pensions, 41 UCLA Law Review 75 (1993).

A number of people read and commented on those articles; I thanked them then, and I thank them again, especially Bernie Black, Jeff Gordon, Victor Goldberg, and Lou Lowenstein, who commented on them all. Special thanks go to Ronald Gilson, my collaborator for an article on which chapter 19 is based, and Bevis Longstreth, both of whom read and commented on the book as a whole.

Financial support for release time came from the Bradley Foundation in 1990; the Columbia Institutional Project also supported my efforts. Two deans at Columbia Law School, Barbara Black and Lance Liebman, were generous in relieving me from administrative and other responsibilities to work on this book. Julie Gavazov and Lyn Grossman did some fine editorial work.

April 1994 Columbia Law School

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