The Tet Offensive

By Marc Jason Gilbert; William Head | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Dr. Kissinger's remarks come from Henry Kissinger, The White House Years ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1979).
2.
See Donald Oberdorfer, Tet! (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1971), [hereafter Tet!].
3.
Ibid.
.
The aforementioned general facts on the Tet Offensive come from ibid.
5.
For more information on the Communist planning of the Tet Offensive, see ibid.; Vo Nguyen Giap, "Big Victory, Great Task" ( New York: Praeger, 1968).
6.
This quote can be found in Tran Van Tra, Vietnam: History of the Bulwark B2 Theatre, Volume 5, Concluding the 30-Years War ( Ho Chi Minh City: Van Nghe Publishing House, 1982).
7.
Ibid.
8.
Tra's book mentioned above alludes to such a suggestion.
9.
For views on the effects of the U.S. media on the war and on how Tet was perceived see Peter Braestrup, Big Story!, 2 volumes (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1977). In his memoirs Westmoreland discusses his role in Tet and his belief that Tet was a great victory which could have led to complete victory with 250,000 additional troops; see A Soldier Reports ( New York: Doubleday, 1976).
10.
Johnson's attitudes and his "public relations" effort before Tet can be found in his autobiography The Vantage Point: Perspectives of the Presidency, 1963-1969 ( New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1971) and Larry Berman Lyndon Johnson's War: The Road to Stalemate in Vietnam ( New York: Norton, 1989) [hereafter Lyndon Johnson's War]. Another excellent source for these issues is The Pentagon Papers: The Defense Department History of United States Decision Making in Vietnam, U.S. Senator Gravel edition ( Boston: Beacon, 1971).
11.
For details on Tet as a psychological turning point see Oberdorfer, Tet!.
12.
For an extended view of the mood in Saigon following Tet, see Bui Diem and David Chanoff, In the Jaws of History ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987). For a detailed view of the mood in Washington see Berman, Lyndon Johnson's War.
13.
In her analysis, The Viet Cong in Saigon: Tactics and Objectives during the Tet Offensive ( Santa Monica, Calif.: Rand Corporation, 1969), Victoria Pohle agrees that the Saigon leadership was very confident immediately following Tet. However, she believes that they came to understand that the United States might pull out sooner, and with fateful results. In any case, once this was understood everyone realized that without the United States, as things stood in 1968, it would be very difficult to preserve the South Vietnamese government.

-134-

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The Tet Offensive
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms ix
  • Preface xiii
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • Notes 15
  • 2 - The Tet Offensive 17
  • Notes 43
  • 3 - The Tet Offensive and Sino-Vietnamese Relations 45
  • Notes 59
  • 4 - The Nlf and the Tet Offensive 63
  • Notes 69
  • 5 - Giap and Tet Mau Than 1968: The Year of the Monkey 73
  • Notes 85
  • 6 - The Tet Offensive and Its Aftermath 89
  • Notes 119
  • 7 - My Recollections of the Tet Offensive 125
  • Notes 134
  • 8 - The Tet Offensive and Middletown: A Study in Contradiction 135
  • Notes 141
  • 9 - The Warning That Left Something to Chance: Intelligence at Tet 143
  • Notes 163
  • 10 - Don't Bother Me with the Facts; I've Made Up My Mind: The Tet Offensive in The Context of Intelligence and U.S. Strategy 167
  • Notes 179
  • 11 - Tet Beyond the Wire: TCK/TKN, the General Offensive/General Uprising 181
  • Notes 189
  • 12 - The Battle of Khe Sanh, 1968 191
  • Notes 210
  • 13 - President Johnson and the Decision To Curtail Rolling Thunder 215
  • Notes 228
  • 14 - The Myth of Tet: American Failure and The Politics of War 231
  • Notes 249
  • Selected Bibliography 259
  • Index 269
  • About the Authors and Editors 283
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