Einstein, Picasso: Space, Time and the Beauty That Causes Havoc

By Arthur I. Miller | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

One of the pleasures of interdisciplinary research is meeting like-minded people. While working on this book I had the good fortune to discuss my ideas with art historians who were extremely generous with their time in criticizing my aims and setting out tough-minded issues for me to tackle, forcing me to clarify my own views on art and science. In particular I am grateful to Chris Green, Mike Leja and, of course, Linda Dalrymple Henderson, who is the groundbreaker in studying the interplay between cubist art and science.

Without assistance from the staff of the magnificent Musée Picasso, this book would have been extremely difficult to write. I thank particularly Sylvie Fresnault and Yvonne Sudour, and especially Anne Baldassari, whose pioneering research on Picasso as photographer was of great value to me.

I thank Jonathan Betts, Curator of Horology, The Old Royal Observatory, Greenwich, of the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, England, for his comments on the setting up of time zones; Barbara Bürki and Adolf Meichle of the Einstein Hause, Bern, for their help in forming a picture of Einstein's home life in 1905; and Jürgen Renn of the Max Planck Institut für Wissenschaftgeschichte, Berlin, for his splendid hospitality. Howard Gardner's incisive comments on the psychology of creativity were extremely helpful.

My good friend Mike Brady read the entire manuscript and made invaluable comments that added immeasurably to the book's final form. Among others who read and commented on chapters are Dorothy Edinburgh, Marilia Duffles, Jill Shaw Ruddick and Sarah Star.

I am deeply appreciative of the sabbatical leave for the academic year 1999/2000 generously granted by Derek Roberts in his capacity as Provost of University College London. I need not emphasize the value of uninterrupted work on a complex project.

-ix-

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Einstein, Picasso: Space, Time and the Beauty That Causes Havoc
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Two Worlds as One 1
  • 2 - A Good-Looking Bootblack 9
  • 3 - The Kind of Male Beauty That Caused Such Havoc 41
  • 4 - How Picasso Discovered Les Demoiselles D'Avignon 85
  • 5 - Braque and Picasso Explore Space 127
  • Intermezzo 173
  • 6 - The Annus Mirabilis: How Einstein Discovered Relativity 179
  • 7 - I Really Would Not Have Thought Einstein Capable of That! 215
  • 8 - Creativity in Art and Science 237
  • Notes 269
  • Bibliography 323
  • Photo Credits 341
  • Index 345
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