The Saffron Wave: Democracy and Hindu Nationalism in Modern India

By Thomas Blom Hansen | Go to book overview

3
Organizing the Hindu Nation

LIKE OTHER FORMS of cultural nationalism that hold the nation to be a single unifying thread that always/already unites “the people,” Hindu nationalism is marked by a fundamental ambivalence vis-à-vis modernity and its release of desires and social fragmentation. Cultural nationalisms are generally projects of ideological control, which seek to shape and control the always unfamiliar and unpredictable social forms generated by capitalist modernities. The corollary of such a project of control is an emphasis on discipline and a tight corporate structure that seeks to realize the ideological utopia within the microcosm of the organization. Another corollary is an emphasis on physical strength and self-control: the ability to control one's desires and libido in order to sublimate these urges to unconditional dedication and service to the cause. Historically, these organizational forms have been present in various ways from Turnvater Jahn's gymnasiums in nineteenthcentury Germany, to Mazzini's Young Italy and patriotic uniformed corps all over Europe and elsewhere in the twentieth century.

Most strongly disciplined movements are constructed and reproduced through what Alberoni has termed “unanimity through symbolic integration” (Alberoni 1984, 152±55). In such movements, it is the ability to make assurances of certainty and truth— “we are on the right path”—and to reaffirm identity— “we are the true people” or “we are the authentic nation”—that bestows power and authority on a leadership. The invention and perpetuation of a founding myth is therefore essential for a strategy of unanimity. The founding myth outlines the basic dilemma or conflict that the movement addresses, and invents a certain “fundamental experience” through which a new vision has been formed—most often portrayed as an encounter with and revelation of the true nature of the other. In political movements it may be the formulation of a vision or a “cause”—constructing a collective subject such as the “toiling masses,” a class, the oppressed people, and so on— on whose behalf the movement acts.

The purpose of the founding myth is twofold: first, to demonstrate to the followers as well as to potential supporters that the movement is still as effervescent and vital as at its inception; and second, to realize

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Saffron Wave: Democracy and Hindu Nationalism in Modern India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • The Saffron Wave *
  • Introduction - Hindu Nationalism and Democracy in India 3
  • 1 - Modernity, Nation, and Democracy in India 16
  • 2 - Imagining the Hindu Nation 60
  • 3 - Organizing the Hindu Nation 90
  • 4 - Democracy, Populism, and Governance in India in the 1980s 134
  • 5 - The Saffron Wave 154
  • 6 - Communal Identities at the Heart of the Nation 200
  • 7 - Hindu Nationalism, Democracy, and Globalization 218
  • Notes 239
  • Glossary 269
  • Bibliography 273
  • Index 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 293

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.