The Culture of Opera Buffa in Mozart's Vienna: A Poetics of Entertainment

By Mary Hunter | Go to book overview

Chapter Seven
BEGINNING AND ENDING
TOGETHER: INTRODUZIONI
AND FINALES

ENSEMBLE INTRODUZIONI AND FINALES are among the most universal and durable features of Goldonian and post-Goldonian opera buffa. As ensembles, they frame each work with assertions about the primacy of groups and social processes. They also encapsulate the tension between individual self-determination and group conformity characteristic of the genre as a whole. On a more particular level, introduzioni and finales also typically convey something in miniature about the work in which they occur. For example, introduzioni often prefigure the overarching feel, or ethos, of the work: the multisectional form of the introduction to Fra i due litiganti, with its late entrance of two characters, and the almost manneristic double crescendo of the ending prefigures the imbroglio-ridden quality of the opera as a whole, while the chorus-framed hunting scene at the beginning of Una cosa rara anticipates not only the pastoral setting, but also the relative dramatic stasis of the work. Finales may not reiterate the “feel” of the work, but they often replay in miniature the central narrative. Thus operas centering on a persecuted heroine usually have at least one finale in which all the other characters look for her (often in the dark);1 operas revolving around one or more dupes usually include at least one finale that is the climax or immediate aftermath of the trick played on him or them;2 and operas in which the happy end is dependent on the exposure and neutralization of villainy usually discover and punish the villain in a finale.3 And in both introduzioni and finales, the general social topic of individuals and groups plays with and against the musical and dramaturgical exigencies of beginning and ending.

____________________
1
Fra i due litiganti I and II, L'incognita perseguitata I and II, Giannina e Bernardone I, Una cosa rara I, and La frascatana II are examples from the repertory. Figaro IV obviously connects to this type.
2
I filosofi immaginari I and II, L'arbore di Diana II, Il barbiere IV, Il curioso indiscreto I and II, L'astratto I and II, Il mondo della luna I and II, and Così I and II also fall into this category.
3
Una cosa rara II, Il convitato di pietra II, Le gare generose II. Also Don Giovanni II.

-196-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Culture of Opera Buffa in Mozart's Vienna: A Poetics of Entertainment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 331

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.