Ethical Foundations of Health Care: Responsibilities in Decision Making

By Jane Singleton; Susan McLaren | Go to book overview

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A
Glossary of Philosophical and Health Care Terms
Abortion Termination of pregnancy.
Accountability The extent to which health care professionals can be held in law to account for their actions; making judgements in relation to actions which have measurable outcomes.
Advocacy Defending the cause of an individual or group; informing patients of their rights in health care decisions.
AIDS Acquired immune deficiency syndrome caused by infection with the HIV virus.
Amniocentesis A diagnostic procedure in which amniotic fluid is withdrawn from the sac surrounding a fetus. Down's syndrome and other genetic disorders can be identified by examination of the fluid.
Anencephalic Absence of the brain and part of the skull at birth.
Autonomy The capacity to think, to decide and then to act on the basis of such thought and decision freely and independently.
Autonomy, Principle of In certain areas, an individual has a right to be self‐ governing.
Beneficence, Principle of The well-being or benefit of the individual ought to be promoted.
Caesarean section Delivery of a baby through a surgical incision in the abdominal and uterine walls.
Categorical imperative (Kant) Act only on the maxim through which you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law.
Chemotherapy Treatment of different types of cancer or infections using specific drugs, that is, anti-cancer drugs and antibiotics, respectively.

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