Ethical Foundations of Health Care: Responsibilities in Decision Making

By Jane Singleton; Susan McLaren | Go to book overview

APPENDIX K
The Patient's Charter

SEVEN EXISTING RIGHTS:
Every citizen already has the following National Health Service rights:
1. To receive health care on the basis of clinical need, regardless of ability to pay.
2. To be registered with à GP.
3. To receive emergency medical care at any time, through your GP or the emergency ambulance service and hospital accident and emergency department.
4. To be referred to a consultant, acceptable to you, when your GP thinks it necessary and to be referred for a second opinion if you and your GP agree this is desirable.
5. To be given a clear explanation of any treatment proposed, including any risks and any alternatives, before you decide whether you will agree to the treatment.
6. To have access to your health records, and to know that those working for the NHS will, by law, keep their contents confidential.
7. To choose whether or not you wish to take part in medical research or medical student training.

THREE NEW RIGHTS
From 1 April 1992, you will have three important new rights:
1. To be given detailed information on local health services, including quality standards and maximum waiting times. You will be able to get this information from your health authority, GP or Community Health Council.
2. To be guaranteed admission for virtually all treatments by a specific date no later than two years from the day when your consultant places you in a waiting list. Most patients will be admitted before this date. Currently, 90% are admitted within a year.
3. To have any complaint about NHS services - whoever provides them - investigated, and to receive a full and prompt written reply from the chief executive of your health authority or general manager of your hospital. If you are still unhappy, you will be able to take the case up with the Health Service Commissioner.

NATIONAL CHARTER STANDARDS
There are nine standards of service which the NHS will be aiming to provide for you:
1. Respect for privacy, dignity and religious and cultural belief.

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