International Executive Agreements: Democratic Procedure under the Constitution of the United States

By Wallace McClure | Go to book overview

Chapter 2 THE CENTURY OF ALOOFNESS 1817-1917

IT IS a matter of familiar historical record that subsequent to the unsatisfactory events of the years during which the United States first shared the losses and controversies and then entered into the actual hostilities of the Napoleonic period the thoughts of its people seemed to be concentrated upon internal developments. The nineteenth-century history of the United States is characterized by domestic pursuits. It is not true, however, that the record shows any diminution in the number of international acts to which the United States became a party. A glance at any chronological list will show that, on the contrary, throughout the ten decades between the general European wars that were formally ended at Vienna and the vaster conflict of the World War, both treaties and executive agreements appear in an increasing stream, which at the turn of the century became something of a torrent, whether measured by quantitative or qualitative analysis.

The executive agreements of the preceding period of approximately forty years were not too numerous for individual discussion. Many more years and many more agreements per year render it necessary in the present chapter to proceed by means of groups and examples. There is manifest the spice of variety, ranging all the way from letters rogatory1 to pharmacopoeial formulas2 and including in addition to the classes of agreements to be described, such difficult international questions as extradition,3 fugitives from justice,4 criminal trials,5 and the right to hold real estate in another country.6

A considerable proportion of the earliest agreements after 1817 were of the type already instanced in the case of the "Wilmington Packet" -- a reflection of the far-flung extent of American inter-

____________________
1
2 Malloy 1697. See also USEA(83).
2
2 Malloy 2209.
3
3 Malloy 2637.
4
1 Malloy 360 (361).
5
2 Malloy 1669.
6
2 Malloy 1344.

-52-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Executive Agreements: Democratic Procedure under the Constitution of the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 458

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.