Organizational Learning, Performance, and Change: An Introduction to Strategic Human Resource Development

By Jerry W. Gilley; Ann Maycunich | Go to book overview

on measurement as a means of finding out what is working well, why it is working well, and what can be done to improve it.


Principle 14: Effective HRD Promotes Diversity and Equality in the Workplace

Our nation's evolving demographic makeup has dramatic implications for business--and HRD. As women and minorities constitute an increasing percentage of workers and assume greater roles and responsibilities, their contributions to organizational success become obvious. Often, HRD professionals represent the social conscience of an organization, embracing and promoting diversity and equality as components of a progressive strategic business plan.

Developmental organizations understand the value of differences and encourage diversity. Differences are normal, healthy, and commonly occur among individuals--in fact, our differences make us interesting to others. Differences fuel creativity and innovation, allowing individuals and groups to venture beyond their comfort zones in pursuit of improvements, new ideas, alternative solutions, and challenges to the status quo. Lack of diversity leads to stagnation of the workforce, devoid of the spark needed to nourish competitive thoughts and deeds.

HRD professionals champion diversity and equality throughout an organization--from recruiting and selection to motivation and continuous development to compensation and rewards. Organizations remain competitive and capable of continually reinventing themselves in a culture epitomizing diversity and equality.


Conclusion

Principles define and guide practice within a professional field. In this chapter we have identified the major principles for the field of HRD. Each of these principles provides HRD practitioners guidance toward critical outcomes. Collectively, they serve as a foundation for practice and a prism to filter future opportunities and engagements.

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